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Pics of my Great Grandfathers coues


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#16 Mocha1545

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Great pics! Always love to see the Savage 99! Thanks for sharing.



#17 longshooter

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Great photos, and thank you for posting them again. I missed them the first time around.To answer a couple of questions raised in this thread, the same rifle apparently is shown in both photos. The Winchester Model 88 wasn't introduced until 1955, a year after I graduated from high school. The Savage Model 99 shown apparently was very close to new if the photos are from the 1930s because earliy 99s didn't have pistol grips and the butts were deeply curved. A 99 chambered for the now-obsolete .303 Savage was my first "deer rifle." I was an avid reader of Jack O'Connor's columns, and because of them I became the first hunter I knew to hunt with a scope. Everyone said I was crazy because "scopes made your gun wiggle all over the place" and "you can't get on a buck fast enough when he jumps up."Lots of hunters wore leather soles in the late 1940s when I first started hunting. There weren't many other options, and they were expensive. I wore "dress shoes" for my first couple of hunts until I could afford "work boots" with artificial hard rubber soles.Camouflage wasn't widely available before the Vietnam War. We wore red plaid "hunting shirts" and Levi's. If it was cold, we wore solid drab olive jackets and liners we bought for virtually nothing from stores that sold military surplus items from World War II.Nobody I knew (including me) carried binoculars, and anyone who walked around with a pack on his back would have been laughed off the mountain.As now, there were guys who managed to bring home a deer every year, and guys who couldn't find a deer if their lives depended on it. As for elk, it always has been difficult to draw a tag in Arizona, except for hunts on Indian reservations. The state controlled the wildlife on reservations then, but the tribes added a $25 trespass fee and few hunters were willing to pay it.Thanks again for posting the photos. They brought back a wave of good memories of a time long ago.Bill Quimby



Always enjoy reading your post Bill. Always very educational and always like reading about the history of hunting in Az.

#18 longshooter

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Thanks for the kind words guys.

#19 naturebob

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Larry , You are a kind Gentleman. Some day You will help Me get a toad like You did for Eddy. We gotta hit the hills again before I get to old................BOB!



#20 naturebob

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That second photo does look like something out of a Western. Wish I had some of My Dad to post.  All  I have is a few does hangin out of the trunk of his car. ...............BOB!



#21 CATERPILLAR

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Cool Pics. Look at all th egear we use now a days and many people still do not get a deer with all the gadgets.






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