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Edge

This day in history...

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02 February 1848, the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo is signed making it possible to hunt Coues Whitetails in the United States.

officialtreatyofguadalupehidalgomap.thumb.jpg.82480e79b49aff1df0438b691fe9c7e1.jpg

04 June 1858, the Gadsen Purchase is finalized providing an additional 29,670 sq miles of muzzleloader and archery hunting for the Coues Whitetail.

1200px-Gadsden_Purchase_Cities_ZP_svg.thumb.png.d7a42e273f125ec7984515066aeff91f.png

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Brings me back to a couple of my favorite history projects growing up as an Arizona native and ties right back around to what I love today, and the site. ūüĎƬ†

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The "Gadsden Purchase". 

I have a lot of family in Douglas/Bisbee.  So I know that name well.  Beautiful Gadsden Hotel in Douglas too.  Great restaurant in the hotel.

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16 minutes ago, lancetkenyon said:

The "Gadsden Purchase". 

I have a lot of family in Douglas/Bisbee.  So I know that name well.  Beautiful Gadsden Hotel in Douglas too.  Great restaurant in the hotel.

My great grandfather James N Castle 1853-1927 worked the mines in Mexico and  Douglas and is buried in that city's cemetery.

1919737836_Capture_2021-01-29-09-46-312.png.b0ea6ddbd6667b31076314e72628e8b6.png

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5 hours ago, lancetkenyon said:

  Beautiful Gadsden Hotel in Douglas too.  

I guess Pancho Villa was fond of the Gadsden!

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On 2/2/2021 at 7:40 AM, Edge said:

02 February 1848, the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo is signed making it possible to hunt Coues Whitetails in the United States.

officialtreatyofguadalupehidalgomap.thumb.jpg.82480e79b49aff1df0438b691fe9c7e1.jpg

04 June 1858, the Garden Purchase is finalized providing an additional 29,670 sq miles of muzzleloader and archery hunting for the Coues Whitetail.

1200px-Gadsden_Purchase_Cities_ZP_svg.thumb.png.d7a42e273f125ec7984515066aeff91f.png

Very interesting, can you point me in the direction of where you found this information?  Thanks Donkeyman

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I found the information in a Playboy interview with former President James Polk, Dec, 1859.

Still got that issues centerfold hanging on my wall.6c2cdf81f51974bfcab7dcc09cb623347a357181.jpg.9de2997a2f7ace2d49f75413fa7ad5a5.jpg

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1 hour ago, Edge said:

I found the information in a Playboy interview with former President James Polk, Dec, 1859.

Still got that issues centerfold hanging on my wall.6c2cdf81f51974bfcab7dcc09cb623347a357181.jpg.9de2997a2f7ace2d49f75413fa7ad5a5.jpg

I have the 50th Anniversery issue somewhere. Not as collectable though as the one with Marilyn Monroe.

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1 hour ago, PRDATR said:

I have the 50th Anniversery issue somewhere. Not as collectable though as the one with Marilyn Monroe.

I don't know how I got it but I have a Playboy from the mid 60s. The ads are fascinating including Dan Blocker selling the '67 Chevelle SS. He must've thought it had 'Hoss Power.'

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11 hours ago, Edge said:

I don't know how I got it but I have a Playboy from the mid 60s. The ads are fascinating including Dan Blocker selling the '67 Chevelle SS. He must've thought it had 'Hoss Power.'

There were always Chevy Commercials when Bonanza played. I can remember the commercial for the Chevelle showing it cruising up the on ramp to a highway and the narrator saying something about it having plenty of horsepower to merge into traffic. The 396/375HP was the most sort after engine and there were plenty made but the early production 67 396's were scaled down with 325HP.

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There is a rumor that the reason why it takes a sharp angle NW towards Yuma is because one of the men on the survey crew got very sick and the closest doctor was in Yuma.  The original plan was to head straight west because the US wanted another Port.  Rocky point would have been part of the US and probably AZ.  Not sure if it is true but read about this many years ago and college professor told a similar story.

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where to find this information??  Attend 3rd grade in AZ in the 60's

 

Regarding the line to Yuma.  Maybe a surveyor was sick but Mexico flat out refused the ports and demanded a 50 mile wide area so not make Baja an Island to their country.  For this reason the Gadsden purchase was actually considered a failure at the time.

 

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1 hour ago, runningbird said:

where to find this information??  Attend 3rd grade in AZ in the 60's

 

Regarding the line to Yuma.  Maybe a surveyor was sick but Mexico flat out refused the ports and demanded a 50 mile wide area so not make Baja an Island to their country.  For this reason the Gadsden purchase was actually considered a failure at the time.

 

This ^^^

A straight line would have given the US a deep water port in Guaymas, Mexico.

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