Jump to content

Outdoor Writer

Members
  • Content Count

    3,684
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    19

Everything posted by Outdoor Writer

  1. GAME AND FISH NEWS Dec. 3, 2020 Restrictions in place as bald eagle breeding season begins Outdoor recreationists, pilots, drone operators asked to avoid nesting areas PHOENIX — Arizona’s bald eagles are back, and they will soon be preparing for the next generation of eagles at breeding sites statewide. To assist with the state’s continued bald eagle population growth, the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD) encourages outdoor recreationists, aircraft pilots, drone operators and motorized paragliders to do their part by not disturbing the state’s 92 eagle breeding areas. To protect breeding attempts, some portions of public land and water areas will be temporarily closed to help these majestic animals and ensure even more young eagles take to the skies this spring. “Arizona’s bald eagles are hard at work preparing their nest for what we hope will be a productive breeding season,” said Kenneth “Tuk” Jacobson, bald eagle management coordinator. “The birds nest, forage and roost at rivers and lakes that are also popular recreation spots. That’s why we must be vigilant to help protect the birds and ensure their populations statewide continue to flourish. That success wouldn’t be possible without the cooperation of outdoor recreationists who respect the closures during the breeding season.” During the 2020 breeding season, 71 young hatched, and 55 reached the important milestone of their first flight, known as fledging. Pilots are reminded to maintain the FAA-recommended 2,000-foot above ground level advisory when flying over bald eagle habitat, while drones and paragliders are asked to avoid the areas completely. Bald eagles are sensitive to even short durations of low-flying aircraft activity near their nests, and just a few minutes of disturbance can lead to a nesting failure. AIRSPACE ADVISORY Statewide The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has established a 2,000-foot above ground level (AGL) advisory along the Salt and Verde river drainages and lakes such as Lake Pleasant, Roosevelt Lake and Alamo Lake. These areas are designated on the Phoenix Sectional Aeronautical map and also include Alamo Lake, Ashurst Lake, Greer Lakes, Crescent Lake, Luna Lake, Show Low Lake, Chevelon Canyon Lake, Woods Canyon Lake, Lake Mary, Dogtown Reservoir, White Horse Lake and the Bill Williams National Wildlife Refuge. Special brochures for pilots regarding this advisory can be obtained by calling the Arizona Department of Transportation or AZGFD's Terrestrial Wildlife branch at (623) 236-7506. SEASONAL CLOSURES Verde River A closure for the Verde River below Sycamore Canyon Wilderness is not planned this year unless the eagle pair resumes nesting. Verde River below Sycamore Canyon Wilderness may be closed to foot and vehicle entry from Dec. 1 to June 15. Floating through is allowed, but contact the Coconino National Forest, Red Rock Ranger District office for more information at (928) 203-7500 or (928) 203-2900. Verde River near Chasm Creek is closed to foot and vehicle entry from Dec. 1 to June 30. Floating through is allowed. Contact Prescott National Forest Verde Ranger District (928) 567-4121. Verde River near Cold Water Creek, allows watercraft to float through but no stopping on the river or landing is allowed Dec. 1 to June 30. Contact Prescott National Forest Verde Ranger District at (928) 567-4121. Verde River upstream of the East Verde confluence is closed to vehicle and foot entry from Dec. 1 to June 30. Floating through is allowed, but no stopping in the river or landing is allowed. Contact the Tonto National Forest Cave Creek Ranger District at (480) 595-3300. Verde River near Mule Shoe Bend allows watercraft to float through but no stopping in the river or landing is allowed from Dec. 1 to June 30. Contact the Tonto National Forest Cave Creek Ranger District at (480) 595-3300. Verde River below Bartlett Dam is closed to foot or vehicle entry from Dec. 1 to June 30. Floating through is allowed, but no stopping in the river or landing is allowed. Contact the Tonto National Forest Cave Creek Ranger District at (480) 595-3300. Verde River at the Needle Rock Recreation area is closed to foot and vehicle entry on the east and portions of the west side of the river from Dec. 1 to June 30. Floating through is allowed, but no stopping in the river or landing on the east side of the river is allowed. Contact the Tonto National Forest, Cave Creek Ranger District, (480) 595-3300. Tonto Creek Tonto Creek from Gisela to 76 Ranch is closed to vehicle, foot entry, and floating through from Dec. 1 to June 30. Contact the Tonto National Forest Tonto Basin Ranger District at (928) 467-3200. Tonto Creek inlet to Roosevelt Lake is closed to vehicle and foot entry within 1,000 feet of the nest on land and to watercraft within 300 feet on water from Dec. 1 to June 30. Contact the Tonto National Forest Tonto Basin Ranger District at (602) 225-5395. Salt River Salt River from Horseshoe Bend to Redmond Flat allows watercraft to float through, but no stopping in the river or landing is allowed from Dec. 1 to June 30. Contact the Tonto National Forest Globe Ranger District at (928) 402-6200. Salt River near Meddler Point is closed to vehicle and foot entry within 1,000 feet of the nest on land and to watercraft within 300 feet on water from Dec. 1 to June 30. Contact the Tonto National Forest Tonto Basin Ranger at District (602) 225-5395. Salt River below Stewart Mountain Dam is closed to vehicle or foot entry on the south side of the river from Dec. 1 to June 30. Floating through is allowed. Contact the Tonto National Forest Mesa Ranger District at (480) 610-3300. Salt River near Goldfield-Kerr Fire Station is closed to foot and vehicle entry on the north side of the river from Dec. 1 to June 30. Floating through is allowed. Contact the Tonto National Forest Mesa Ranger District at (480) 610-3300. Crescent Lake A portion of the west side is closed to all entry from March 1 through Aug. 31. Contact the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest Springerville Ranger District at (928) 333-6200. Fool’s Hollow Lake A portion of the shoreline may be closed to foot entry from December 1 through June 31. Contact the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest Lakeside Ranger District at (928) 368-2100. Greer Lakes (Tunnel and River) (not enacted unless pair moves nesting location) - Portions of the lakes may be closed to watercraft and a portion of the shoreline may be closed to foot entry from March 1 through July 31. Contact the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest Springerville Ranger District at (928) 333-6200. Horseshoe Lake Depending on the nesting location, a portion of the lake may be closed from Dec. 1 to June 30. Contact the Arizona Game and Fish Department at (623) 236-7506. Lake Pleasant No vehicle, watercraft or foot entry is allowed into a portion of the Lower Agua Fria Arm from Dec. 15 to June 15. Contact Maricopa County Parks and Recreation at (928) 501-1710. Luna Lake The north side of Luna Lake is closed to vehicle and foot traffic from Jan. 1 to June 15. Contact Apache National Forest Alpine Ranger District at (928) 339-5000. Lynx Lake A portion of trail on the lake’s east side is closed to vehicle and foot traffic from Dec. 1 to June 30. Contact the Prescott National Forest Bradshaw Ranger District at (928) 443-8000. Show Low Lake A portion of the lake may be closed to watercraft and a portion of the shoreline may be closed to foot entry from January 1 through July 31. Contact the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest Lakeside Ranger District at (928) 368-2100. White Horse Lake A portion of the shoreline may be closed to foot entry from March 1 to Aug. 31. Contact the Kaibab National Forest Williams Ranger District at (928) 635-5600. Woods Canyon Lake A portion of the shoreline is closed to foot entry from March 1 through Aug. 31. Contact the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest, Black Mesa Ranger District at (928) 535-7300. TIPS FOR VISITING EAGLE AREAS If you are visiting bald eagle country, an advance call to the local land management agency, such as the local U.S. Forest Service district office or AZGFD, may help to plan your trip to avoid disturbing bald eagles. By following these simple guidelines, we can all help ensure that our living wildlife legacy will last for generations to come: Enjoy bald eagles from outside the closures, which are marked with signs and/or buoys. Watch from a distance using a spotting scope, binoculars or telephoto camera lens. If the eagles are persistently watching you, observation at a greater distance is advised. Anyone approached by a nestwatcher and asked to cease an activity or leave a closed area should comply. A few good places to see bald eagles without disturbing them (during December and January) are at Lake Mary and Mormon Lake near Flagstaff, on the Verde Canyon Train in Clarkdale or Roosevelt Lake. Bald eagles protecting an active nest will let you know if you are too close. If a bald eagle is vocalizing and circling the area frantically, you are too close and need to leave the area quickly. Bald eagles incubating eggs or brooding small young should never be off the nest for more than 15 minutes. Help from anglers is especially needed. Fishing line and tackle have killed two nestlings and been found in two-thirds of all bald eagle nests in the state. Every year biologists remove these lethal hazards from nests and/or entangled nestlings. Discard any fishing line properly in specially-marked recycling containers or at fishing stores. Also, use fresh line that isn’t old and brittle. Use the correct test line for the fish you are trying to catch. Also, do not cut the line when an undesirable fish is caught and return it to the water with the hook and line attached. Duck hunters should scout out their hunting area to ensure that bald eagles are not nesting nearby. You can help conserve and protect bald eagles and conservation research and recovery efforts by reporting any harassment or shooting of bald eagles. Call the Operation Game Thief hotline at (800) 352-0700 or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Law Enforcement at (480) 967-7900. AZGFD’s bald eagle management efforts are supported by the Heritage Fund, an initiative passed more than 20 years ago to provide for wildlife education and conservation through Arizona lottery ticket sales.
  2. Outdoor Writer

    Osceolla Turkeys.

    The Osceola was the final one of my turkey slam, as well. I killed that bird on the Seminole Res. Even got to stay in a traditional chickee hut. It was a fun hunt, even with the temps in the 80s. 😎
  3. This 1st edition of Outdoors in Arizona: A Guide to Fishing and Hunting by Bob Hirsch was published by Arizona Highways Books in 1986. The 192-pg., 8 1/2"X11" softcover is heavily illustrated on quality glossy paper with dozens of color photos, maps and artwork done by noted wildlife artist Larry Toschik. Many of the photos were taken by me and my photography mentor, the late Jim Tallon. One of Jim's photos shows our old friend, the late Gene Henry, with a 10-lb rainbow from Lee's Ferry. The book breaks down the state into ten regions and covers both the fishing & hunting in all of them. But don't expect learning much or finding a secret spot since the book was meant to be more pretty than educational. 😉 My copy is basically in excellent unread condition but does have some minor wear marks on the edges of the spine from sitting in the bookcase. I will consider reasonable offers but no trades. Payment via PayPal (buyer doesn't need an acct; just a CC or checking acct.) or cash only. Can be picked up near 67th Ave. & Camelback in Glendale, AZ or shipped at buyer's expense ($4) $25
  4. Go for it!!! I've also thrown away oodles of old magazines but still have boxes of them, including many individual AZ Hunter & Angler issues, most of which have a photo I took on the cover. I also have many old Gray's Sporting Journals, which contain many very well written articles compared to the pablum found in the run of the mill outdoor mags. RE: Hunt Arizona -- are you taliking about the booklet the AGFD used to publish with all the stats in them? If so, I have several of the older ones around.
  5. Outdoor Writer

    Osceolla Turkeys.

    Good luck, Bob. This is what to look for, but you'll find it kind of weird chasing turkeys among the palms. 🤣
  6. Outdoor Writer

    Arizona Unit 5B N&S Nov 27-Dec5 2020

    Well done.
  7. Outdoor Writer

    Help me find my Gun Dog's family.

    She was a dandy but was merely a couch potato, not a hunter 🤣 We adopted her from another family who had too many dogs. Beasley's mother's's name was Buffy, thus the Mrs. Beasley handle from the 1960s era TV show, Family Affair. On the show, Buffy was the little girl & Mrs. Beasley was her doll's name. Good luck finding your guy. Regardless of the bloodline, Titan is a dandy looking pup.
  8. Outdoor Writer

    Help me find my Gun Dog's family.

    Sure looks like he has a lot of English Springer Spaniel blood in him. This one was ours in the 1980s. Mrs Beasley
  9. Outdoor Writer

    Carpet Installation & Repair

    Hmmm...nice avatar...Is this you??
  10. Outdoor Writer

    My Mentor

    Thinking it might turn into a nice trip down memory lane, I started this thread as an off-shoot of the "Good ole days on ammo prices" one. In that thread I mentioned (see below) my early mentor from the 1960s of all things hunting, and that he and his son were noted for a certain hunting discipline. "Yup. I had a PM conversation with another member , and that's how we remembered it. Govway was like an airplane hanger and later became a skatng rink. He also brought up one of my hangouts in the 1960s, Bellow's Sporting Goods at 27th Ave. & Camelback. My dad had a gas station next to Fergison's Cafeteria on the corner of 27 Ave. and Indian School. I worked for him as a mechanic until about 1969 when they tore up the road to widen it, sending his business south. Ed Bellows and I, plus two others, did a DIY horseback hunt in Colorado's San Juan Mts. one year. One of my hunting mentors on all things AZ also hung out there. I'll see if anyone might be able to guess who it was. " So far the guesses included all of these incorrect ones: Bob Hirsch, Bob Housholder, Manuel Sinohui, Mickey Del Re, Steve Galizioli and Ben Avery. These are a few of my replies: Good guesses, but no. I met Householder but didn't know him well. My mentor was actually older than both of them, and he and his son (who was about Hirsch's age) were noted for a certain discipline of hunting. In contrast, Hirsch and I were good friends from about 1969 until his death in 2007. In the 1990s, Kurt VonBesser, the owner of Atsko Inc. (Snowseal, UV Killer. Etc.) and I drew archery elk permits in unit 7W. Hirsch let me use his 23' trailer for Kurt's comfort. It had seen a lot of neglect in the kitchen and bath areas. So when we got done with the hunt, I told Hirsch to leave it with me for while and I'd get it fixed up. I completely rebuilt the cabinet area that held the sink, stove and oven and replaced the floor that had warped because of a water leak. Another good guess. Although, Mickey and I became friends, I didn't know him well until the early 1970s when I was a road rep and sold hunt/fish stuff to him & his brother, Ed, at their store on Northern. I did hunt with Mickey twice, tho -- once for deer & turkey in TX and once for elk near Pagosa Springs. And in the 1970s when we had our lodge at Vallecito Lake in Colo., Mick, usually with his close friend, Chet Hansen (Hansen Mortuary) or others along, would come up a couple times a year to fish for northern pike with me. From PM: Nope, though Steve was another good friend. Jim Tallon, Steve and I hunted dove and quail together a lot. They are both dead now. you don't think he is talking about Ben Avery do you? thats just too obvious.................................... -- No, not Ben.
  11. GAME AND FISH NEWS Dec. 1, 2020 Arizona Game and Fish Department AZGFD online license purchase system will be unavailable Dec. 4-7 due to system upgrade PHOENIX — Arizona Game and Fish Department customers are advised that online hunting or fishing license purchases through the AZGFD website will not be available from 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 4, through Monday, Dec. 7, due to technical upgrades being made to the AZGFD customer service system. Customers who need a license during this time frame should either buy it online before 5 p.m., Friday, Dec. 4, or buy a paper license from an authorized license dealer. The Department anticipates the upgraded online license purchase system will be available by 8 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 8. Portal account holders will be able to view their information but will be unable to make changes during this time period. The system upgrades will allow for improved functionality, security, and will be a foundation on which the Department can build and expand future products and services for customers.
  12. GAME AND FISH NEWS Dec. 1, 2020 Arizona Game and Fish Department Arizona Game and Fish Commission to meet Dec. 4 in Payson PAYSON, Ariz. — The next meeting of the Arizona Game and Fish Commission will be held Friday, Dec, 4, in Payson at the Quality Inn, Conference Room, 801 N. Beeline Highway. The meeting begins at 8 a.m. There are now more ways than ever before to speak to agenda items before the Commission. The public may attend the meeting in person, but the number of people allowed in the meeting facility will be limited based on social distancing requirements. Be advised for this meeting that the Town of Payson requires face coverings in public settings where six feet physical distance cannot be maintained. However, the public may also view the meeting at www.azgfd.gov/commissioncam or may listen to the meeting by calling (404) 397-1516, Access code: 280 046 234##. Members of the public may also view the meeting from any AZGFD office via video teleconference. People attending in person or viewing the meeting via video teleconference from an AZGFD office may submit a Speaker Card (Blue Card) if they wish to speak to the Commission on a particular agenda item. Those viewing the webcast who wish to speak to the Commission on a specific agenda item can call (602) 962-8790 and follow the prompts to say your name, where you are calling from, and the agenda item you wish to speak about. People may also email comments in advance of or during the meeting to sbernal@azgfd.gov. Please note that the ability of the public to attend the meeting in person is subject to change in the event Covid-related restrictions on public events are modified prior to the meeting. If this occurs, the aforementioned options to watch, listen and comment via electronic means will still be available. Copies of any presentations, documents, etc. discussed during the meeting will be available by contacting sbernal@azgfd.gov. A complete agenda can be found here or at https://www.azgfd.com/agency/commission/meetingagenda/.
  13. GAME AND FISH NEWS Dec. 1, 2020 Mearns' quail season opens Friday PHOENIX — The wait is over for hunters eager to get out and stomp around the often steep and rocky terrain of southeastern Arizona in search of Mearns’ quail. The season begins Friday, Dec. 4, and runs through Feb. 7, 2021. The season for Gambel’s, scaled and California quail has been underway since Oct. 16 and also closes Feb. 7, 2021. A valid Arizona hunting or combination license is required for all hunters 10 and older. All youth hunters 10 to 17 can purchase a youth combination license for only $5. Those hunters under 10 must be accompanied by an adult who possesses a valid hunting or combination license. Licenses can be purchased online at azgfd.com/license/, or from license dealers statewide. Note: The Arizona Game and Fish Department’s online license purchase system will be unavailable Dec. 4-7 due to a system upgrade. The general bag limit is 15 quail per day in the aggregate, of which no more than eight may be Mearns’ quail. Since the beginning of the season, the general possession limit has been 45 quail in the aggregate, of which no more than 15 Gambel’s, scaled or California quail in the aggregate may be taken in any one day. After Friday’s opening of the Mearns’ season, the 45-quail possession limit may include 24 Mearns’ quail, of which no more than eight may be taken in any one day. Meanwhile, the department is inviting quail hunters in southeastern Arizona to help gather data for quail management purposes. The department has placed five wing barrel stations along popular travel routes, where quail hunters can submit one wing along with brief information like date, harvest location, hunter effort expended. While submitting wings is not mandatory, the information collected from wing barrels provides the best means for the department to index quail reproduction — particularly for Mearns’ quail — harvest rates, and hunter effort and success. For more information about the wing barrels, a photo that shows what a wing barrel looks like, and a map, see page 78 in the “2020-2021 Arizona Hunting Regulations” booklet. For more information about Arizona’s quail species, visit www.azgfd.com/hunting/species/smallgame/quail/.
  14. Outdoor Writer

    Mearns

    No, never hunted anything in that area of the state. Only fished Becker Lake near Springerville, and that was a LOT of years ago. 🤣
  15. Quail Hunting In America: Tactics For Finding and Taking Bobwhite, Valley, Gamble, Mountain, Scaled, and Mearns Quail by Season and Habitat (Tactics ... and Taking Bobwhite, Valley, Gambel, Mou) Hardcover – Illustrated, February 1, 1987 This UNREAD, autographed, 285-pg. book was written by a longtime friend from Michigan, Tom Huggler. While researching the book, Tom, an ex-English professor, spent a week at my house. Along with his two English setters, Chaucer & MacBeth, we made several forays afield for all of AZ's quail species. If I recall, a couple of photos of mine, icluding the cover, are in the book. I will consider reasonable offers but no trades. Payment via PayPal (buyer doesn't need an acct; just a CC or checking acct.) or cash only. Can be picked up near 67th Ave. & Camelback in Glendale or shipped at buyer's expense. SOLD The signature reads: "For Tony, with thanks for your friendship and contribution, warmest personal regards - Tom Huggler 1-20-87
  16. Outdoor Writer

    Mearns

    Even if you don't get into Mearns, you might find some gambels and scalies. The latter are about like gambels.
  17. Outdoor Writer

    Mearns

    There are decent areas all around TS. Get a topo map and look for hilly terrain. The foothills around the Dragoons to the north and Mule Mts. to the south have Mearns, and there are areas east and west of town that might be good. Just be aware of private property where applicable. I can't give you any more accurate help because I've never hunted that area. Here's what AGFD says for Unit 30B.... Quail Overview: The quail populations (Gambel and Scaled) in the unit will respond to winter rainfall. Overall, we are below average, however rain occurred throughout the winter/spring and created green-up and the quail may respond. The quail populations suffer from drought and respond favorably to average to above average rainfall. Review past weather conditions in area you are considering for a hunt. See Access Information for details. Pre-season scouting will improve your hunt success. Be sure and have all the pertinent hunt regulations with you before you go hunting. Please pick up spent shot-shells, complaints have been received because livestock have ingested them causing complications and it is littering, a revocable offense. Area: Gambel’s quail can be found in isolated areas in the unit. An area where greater concentrations exist is along the San Pedro River (Call 520-439-6400 or see http://www.blm.gov/az/st/en/prog/blm_special_areas/ncarea/sprnca.html ) Some areas of the river are closed to firearms hunting. The San Pedro River can be accessed near Benson, St. David, HWY 82, Charleston Road, and HWY 92. Other areas of quail concentrations can be found in upper elevations along the mountain drainage’s, and stock tanks. Scaled quail can be found throughout the unit in high desert grassland communities. Larger concentrations of scaled quail tend to be found along the base of the eastern side of the Dragoon Mountains, and in the Cochise, Dragoon, and Sunsites/Pearce area, and along the Mexican Border. The eastern side of the Dragoon Mountains, Cochise, and Sunsites can be accessed from Highway 191 south of I-10. Recently, residential development in the Pearce/Sunsite area has increased, thus eliminating areas to hunt. During good years large populations can be found along the Davis Road, Gleason Road, and the Pearce Road. A popular area for quail hunting is now closed to all access; the Double U Ranch or Telles Ranch has been locked and no longer allows sportsmen’s access. Mearns’ quail are harder to find because of the nature of the quail and because they are found in much smaller concentrations in this unit. They have been found in small pockets in the southwest portion of the Dragoon Mountains, off the Middle-March Road, and in the upper elevations of the Mule Mountains. Denied access in the Mule Mountains makes it extremely difficult to access these areas. The west side of the Dragoon Mountains can be reached by taking Highway 80 south of I-10 at Benson. Continuing down Highway 80 to Middle March Road, which is only a couple of miles north of Tombstone. Turn east on the Middle-March road and drive approximately 10 miles until you reach the Forest Service Boundary. Take Forest Service Road 687 north along the west side of the mountain into the West Stronghold. The east side of the mountain is accessed off the Dragoon Road, Ironwood Road, and Middle-March Road. The Mule Mountains can be accessed off High Lonesome Road and Highway 80. Several canyon roads in the Mules go through private land and are posted and locked, so respect the ranchers’ wishes. Hiking across state land will access the upper parts of the canyons. Pre-season scouting will improve your hunt success. Be sure and have all the pertinent hunt regulations with you before you go hunting. Please pick up spent shot-shells, complaints have been received because livestock have ingested them causing complications and it is littering, a revocable offense.
  18. Outdoor Writer

    Dove Pate

    I bet jalapeno poppers might be pretty good.
  19. Outdoor Writer

    Mearns

    You can usually find them on any of the grassy, oak covered hills in the southern part of the state. One time I was after Coues in the Chiricahuas with 3" of snow on the ground. I kicked up a covey that was literally buried in the grass under the snow. When they took off, snow was flying everywhere, and I was cleaning out my drawers. 🤣 Sign to look for is scratchings where they use their long claws to dig tubers and such.
  20. Outdoor Writer

    Mearns

    Tom had a great way with words, probably vecause he wasonce an Engish professor. That's whi he baned his two English Setters, chaucer and Macbeth. As for calling, I never heard Mearns make any sounds except when flushing. So don't count on finding them that way.
  21. Outdoor Writer

    Mearns

    Here's some stuff from Quail Hunting In America, written in 1987 by my friend Tom Huggler. The photo is one I took of Tom for the book. The cover photo is also one I shot. I have the 1st edition book listed FS in the Classified.
  22. Outdoor Writer

    Mearns

    Mearns can be tough hunting without a pup. Unlike gambels which tend to scurry away, Mearns like to hunker down much like bobwhites do and will only bust out if you get real close. There have many times when I came unglued while Coues hunting after nearly stepping on a covey of Mearns before they beat it. I tried to hunt them twice without dogs to no avail. I think I recall killing one bird. Then I went on a hunt with Floyd Preas and his Britany. Big diff. Later, I had my own pup -- a German shorthair, and she was great on both Mearns & gambels.
  23. Outdoor Writer

    My sons 1st Coues

    Man, he'll have a hard time besting that buck in the future. Good job, Houston and nameless son. 🙄
×