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Outdoor Writer

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Everything posted by Outdoor Writer

  1. Outdoor Writer

    Duwane's Hunter Killed a Monster

    Video on Facebook On the hoof: Facebook
  2. Outdoor Writer

    So...who's gonna win??

    I'm saying Mahomes & KC will prevail. Several years in arrears, like in 2016, my oldest son Keith & I were watching Texas Tech play Arizona State on TV. It was one of the wildest games I've ever seen as they racked up a 68-55 score with ASU on top by virtue of Kevin Ballage tying an NCAA record with 8 TDs in a game. In the meatime, Mahomes was bending, spindling, stapling & mutilating ASU's defense with more than 500 yards in the air & 5 TDs, plus another TD rushing. He was a junior. To say it was fun to watch, would be way understated. That said, about 1/2 way through the 2nd quater, I said to Keith, "You're watching the next great NFL quaterback. He's going to win a bunch of Super Bowls. Write it down." I should have been a scout. Fast forward to tomorrow, when Mahomes wins his 2nd SB.
  3. Outdoor Writer

    FYI --New Log-In For AGFD Portal

    Just received the message below from AGFD and made the PW change as directed. It all went smoothly. It appears a lot of the information you use to apply for permits will now be stored with your account, perhaps removing the need to type in anything when applying. This is posted as a FYI to let everyone know the email is legit. The sender is customer@Azgfd.gov As an Arizona Game and Fish Department account holder, we want to share an exciting update with you! We have added new features to make the account your one-stop shop for online wildlife needs. Your information has been moved over to the new system, and your new login information is below. Your username is axxxxxxx and temporary password is XXXXXX. Please log in to your account and update your password. If you have any questions or run into an issue, call 602-942-3000 and choose option 7 for account support. Arizona Game and Fish Department | azgfd.com | 602-942-3000 Our mission is to conserve Arizona’s diverse wildlife resources and manage for safe, compatible outdoor recreation opportunities for current and future generations.
  4. Outdoor Writer

    DONATE!!!!

    Hosting CWT doesn't come without expenses. I'm pretty sure Amanda will never ask those who sell items here to donate a portion of the sale price to CWT, but...it's something to consider doing voluntarily for the privilege. If we sell items on eBay or other such sites, we would pay anywhere from 5 to 10% per sale. The amount you donate is up to you, of course. So if you have a mind to, use amanda@coueswhitetail.com to send money via PapPal. You can use a credit or debit card or your checking account, and if do not have a PP account, let Amanda know via the same email above. She can then send a Money Request for the amount you wish to donate to your email, which will have a link to PP.
  5. Outdoor Writer

    "Daddy we did it!"

    Great. At least you get to teach him the good things in life. Keep up the good work.
  6. Outdoor Writer

    DONATE!!!!

    bump
  7. Outdoor Writer

    "Daddy we did it!"

    I know. That's why I typed "must have been" as in past tense. Do you have custody?
  8. Outdoor Writer

    "Daddy we did it!"

    Cool. 👍 Nice looking lad, too. His mother must have been pretty. 🙄
  9. Outdoor Writer

    Close Encounter of the First Kind

    I can vouch that an experience like that will make one soil their shorts. That short film nearly mirrors the exact thing that I had happen several years ago. These are my personal encounters with moose from another thread like this one: About 30 years ago, I was on a deer/elk pack-in hunt back in the Grey Mts. in Wy. There were about five other hunters in camp and one of them had drawn a moose permit. So one day, I had ridden my horse out alone to hunt in a place the outfitter had told me about. I tied up my horse and headed up a small ridge. There was a game trail right on top, so I decided to sit on a stump a bit because it afforded a good view of the valley below. I was there about 15 min. when I heard a shot that came from the heavily wooded area below me. Five minutes later, I had a bull moose barreling down the trail toward my stump., and I could see blood pumping out of his side. I had my .264 across my lap but quickly raised it just in case. The moose kept coming. When it was about 10-12 yards from me, I shot it in brisket. He dropped immediately. As I was wiping my butt, the guy with the moose permit and his guide appeared to claim his prize. The other incident also happened many, many moons ago when I was personally hunting moose in northern BC. My Slavey indian guide and I had left the main camp and set up a spike camp on a lake about 10 miles away. We spent six days searching for moose & caribou wthout much success. Then one day, we were riding across a ridge in a light rain, and I had to take a leak. After I was done, I decided to glass across my saddle down into a big valley below us. Within a minute, I saw something white move in a big stand of alders. When it moved again, I could tell it was a moose antler. I told Jimmy, and he asked me if I could shoot it from there, which was about a 1/2 mile. I just laughed, then told him we're heading down there. So I took off my rainsuit, hitched up my socks and we were on our way. What I didn't realize was the alders were much taller and thicker than they looked from above. We began to push our way thru them, and all of a sudden, the moose busted out, running along a hill about 125 yds broadside to us. I told Jimmy to bend over. While he covered his ears, I rested on his back and got off three shots. I heard and saw them hit. After each of the first two, Jimmy confirmed them with, "You got 'em," and I said, "stay down" so I could shoot a third time. Problem was the moose didn't seem to know I had hit him. He took off racing over the top, where we lost sight of him. It took us at least 1/2 hr. to get thru the alders and over the hill. There we could see my moose about 50 yards away. He was lying amid a lot of blown down jackpine-type trees with brush on either side and had his head fairly upright. While Jimmy, who didn't even have a gun, stood off to the side, I moved around in front until I was about 10 yards away. I planned to shoot just under his chin, but when I raised the rifle, it was still on 9X; all I could see was hair. I lowered it to adjust the scope. When I did the moose stood and started toward me. Uphill from me, he seemed huge -- like I was looking up at his head ten feet above me. I turned to run, but tripped on one of the deadfalls. Both me and the rifle went flying. As I covered my head with my arms, I yelled to Jimmy to tell my wife I love her. Then I heard the crash. The moose had died and fallen about 10 feet behind me. When we field dressed and skinned him, we found all three of my bullets against the farside hide in an area about the size of a pie plate They had pretty much wiped out the lungs but had missed the heart. And I survived! 🤣 ******************** Geez, I forgot the other moose attack I had survived in Yellowstone NP. I had located a decent bull that was meandering between the road and the shoreline of Yellowstone Lake. So I parked my truck, grabbed my cameras and proceeded to get into a good spot to take some pics. I was doing just fine; I snapped the shutter and the moose continued what he was doing. That all changed when a bus load of Japanese (maybe Chinese) tourists also saw the moose and dismounted the bus in mass. Within two minutes they had the moose's attention as they closed in on it from behind. Then he started toward me; he didn't appear real happy. I couldn't get to the road so I quickly backed up to a very large downed tree that had been propped up about 5' above the ground. I was able to duck under it to the other side just before the moose arrived, reared on his hind legs and hammered the downed tree with his front hooves. I was literally shaking in my boots. It seemed like a very long time, but it was probably only two minutes or less before he got bored with me, moved down to where the tree entered the water and walked around the tree to my side. That's when I ducked back to the other side and ran as fast as I could to the road and my truck. I sat there and watched while the tourists loaded back on the bus as if nothing unusual had happened.
  10. Outdoor Writer

    So...who's gonna win??

    Makes it a bit tough when you visit your favorite whorehouse, no?
  11. Outdoor Writer

    So...who's gonna win??

    Only an idiot would predict that. Oh wait, you already did.
  12. Outdoor Writer

    Model 70 264

    If I was 25 yrs. younger, you'd have a sale so I could replace my 50+ yr; old M70 .264 that has been my go-to rifle for a long, long time. Good luck with the sale.
  13. Outdoor Writer

    So...who's gonna win??

    I'm the same way as far as watching SB games. In fact, I stopped watching all NFL games several years ago after they became pass happy, penalty filled affairs. I much prefer college football but usually only tune into either ASU or the more glorious matchups or rivalries. And I love it when Ohio State or Michigan loses. I began rooting a bit for the KC long before Mahomes arrived on the scene. In fact, he wasn't even born yet. 😀 In the late 1980s, I spent a week hunting deer in Iowa with several sports stars. Among them was an ex-KC quarterback, Tony Adams. He was a class act, so I always associated the Chiefs with him. Same goes for the GB Packers & Atlanta Falcons because I had hunted with ex-QBs -- Lynn Dickey (GB) & Steve Bartkowski (ATL). In case you can't tell, I reserve my cheers to teams I feel somewhat connected to. Other examples were the AZ Cardinals when TE Jim Dray was there and the Houston Texans when All-Pro LB Brian Cushing was there. Both are alumni of my high school.
  14. Fishes of Arizona by Wendell Minckley is an indispensable guide for biologists & sportsmen to identifying Arizona's fish species. Published in 1973 by the Arizona Game & Fish Department and no longer in print, the 293 pg. softcover book measures 6" x 9" and contains many B&W illustrations. My 1st edition copy, though unread, has a few pages that are loose and a bit of discoloration along the spine of the cover from nearly 50 years of shelf life. Thus, I'm pricing it accordingly in 'as-is' condition. I will consider reasonable offers but no trades. Payment via PayPal (buyer doesn't need an acct; just a CC or checking acct.) or cash only if picked up near 67th Ave. & Camelback in Glendale, AZ. SHIPPING at buyer's expense. SOLD ABOUT THE AUTHOR: The late ichthyologist Dr. Wendell Lee Minckley (1935-2001), one of the founding members of the Desert Fishes Council and a lifetime supporter of its work, will be well-known to those familar with freshwater fishes of the southwestern United States and Mexico. He studied aquatic ecosystems and southwestern fishes, authoring a number of books, research articles and book chapters as well as co-authoring ‘Freshwater Fishes of Mexico’ with Robert Rush Miller, the latter eventually being published in 2005. Dr. Minckley was also Professor of Life Sciences at Arizona State University in Tempe, United States for almost four decades during which time he collected an extensive library of reprints and other references with the aim of making this freely-available in an online format for all to use. A Recent Review: When thinking of Arizona wildlife, most people are more apt to picture snakes and lizards than fish, but in fact the state has an abundance of streams, rivers, and lakes, and these are home to a wide variety of both native and introduced fishes. This book was one of the earliest reference works to identify the fishes found in the state, and remains an indispensable guide for biologists, sportsmen, and observers of nature. While today one is most likely to encounter various introduced species in Arizona's waterways, 100 years ago a rich and varied mixture of naturally occurring species inhabited these same waters. Whether driven out by introduced species or pushed to near-extinction by changes in habitat (such as dams), many fish that once thrived in the state are now altogether absent or are very difficult to find. From tiny minnows and chubs, to the huge Colorado River Squawfish (itself a minnow, despite its up to six-foot legnth) the unique circumstances of the desert waters made for many interesting and beautiful fish. In particular, many fishes were adapted to the cycle of drought and flood common to Arizona, and as such, took on appearances found nowhere else in the world. Most of these species are found in but a tiny area of their former ranges, if they are to be found at all, but in recent years efforts have been made to insure the continued presence of these fishes in at least small parts of the state. The author did his research at a time when there were many individuals still to be found in the state who had clear memories of waterways such as the Colorado, Salt, and Gila Rivers when they still flowed freely, prior to the construction of major dams, as well as a time prior to the introduction of non-native fishes such as Largemouth Bass and Rainbow Trout. He has drawn heavily on these memories to help construct a book which is interesting to non-academics as well as to professionals who require a scientific work. The author gives ample attention to non-native species which are commonly pursued by sportsmen. Some of these species, such as Brown Trout in the Little Colorado River and Yellow Bass in the lakes formed by damming the Salt River east of Phoenix, have not been stocked for decades, but have become "native" in the minds of many fishermen because they have adapted well and have become self sustaining. Unfortunately, other non-native species which are detested by almost everyone, such as Carp, have adapted very well also. This book provides an excellent guide to help the outdoorsman locate suitable waters for a particular fish, as well as to provide excellent descriptions to aid in identification. It would serve as a superior reference to a sportsman who is fishing a remote stream where it might be more likely to encounter fishes not familiar to the fisherman, and which might be protected by law. Knowledge provided by this book might help the fisherman avoid taking a protected fish, further endangering the species and potentially resulting in a hefty fine. "Fishes of Arizona" is a useful book for readers from states bordering Arizona as well. A resident of Southern Nevada, such as myself, might well encounter fish referenced in this work while visiting waters such as the Colorado River and the Virgin River, whose runs either form the border between the two states, or have significant portions running through both states. Lake Mead biologists working out of Las Vegas frequently reference this book. More than 30 years since I bought my copy, I still find myself frequently consulting my now rather stained and tattered edition, well worn from heavy use. It may be time to pick up a new copy, and I thoroughly endorse this excellent guide for anyone with an interest in the fish of Arizona. TM List
  15. Outdoor Writer

    SOLD -- FISHES OF ARIZONA by Wendell Minckley

    On it's way.
  16. Outdoor Writer

    SOLD -- FISHES OF ARIZONA by Wendell Minckley

    Did you note this: My 1st edition copy, though unread, has a few pages that are loose and a bit of discoloration along the spine of the cover from nearly 50 years of shelf life. Thus, I'm pricing it accordingly in 'as-is' condition.
  17. The Guide to Bass Fishing: Central Arizona Lakes was published by Tres Amigos Pub in 1976 -- old friends Bob Hirsch (gave me my copy), Gene Henry and Dalton Babb. The 120-pg. paperback covers 7 lakes -- Roosevelt, San Carlos, Pleasant, Bartlett, Apache, Canon and Saguaro -- with topo maps for all of them. This is no doubt the rarest book in my collection. I can't find another copy anywhere online, including eBay. Only reference to one is a listing on Amazon to one for $79.75 plus $5.99 shipping. I will consider reasonable offers but no trades. Payment via PayPal (buyer doesn't need an acct; just a CC or checking acct.) or cash only. Must be picked up near 67th Ave. & Camelback in Glendale or shipped FREE. SOLD This is an image from the Amazon listing. My copy is in better condition, as in very good to excellent
  18. Outdoor Writer

    So...who's gonna win??

    Smart guy.
  19. Outdoor Writer

    So...who's gonna win??

    Thing is I didn't know a thing about him before that game. My assessment was purely from watching him play that day for a little over one quarter.
  20. Outdoor Writer

    $$$ IRONWOOD CARVINGS ANYONE???

    These are carved ironwood items from Mexico. I have about a dozen or so from a scorpion to a large eagle with spread wings. In between, there are elk, deer, rams, bears, ducks, a moose, a quail and a roadrunner. They are very heavy and except for a couple, they are highly polished, very dark brown color. These were all purchased by me in Mazatlan, Puerto Vallarta and near Caborca before 1990. I know at least two of them are genuine Seri indian carvings. I'm not sure about any of the others. Prices on these have gone up considerably since I bought any because of the crackdown on ironwood trees. These are some quickie photos, albeit a bit dusty. 😉 I'll try to get better individual ones and measurements in the next coupe days when I feel like getting on a ladder to get them down. For some perspective, the eagle's right wing is about 20-22 in. high. and the tip-to-tip spread is anout 12 in. I will consider reasonable offers but no trades. Payment via PayPal (buyer doesn't need an acct; just a CC or checking acct.) or cash only. Must be picked up near 67th Ave. & Camelback in Glendale, AZ or shipped at buyer's expense. History from Wikipedia: The craft originated with the Seri people as a way to earn money from tourists. In the first half of the 20th century, the Seri were mostly confined to Tiburon Island, coming into Kino Bay seasonally to sell firewood, which included ironwood. In the mid 20th century, the traditional Seri economy was disrupted by shrimping in the Gulf of California, which reduced the sea species the Seri needed for food. In the late 1950s, tourism in the area took off in the Kino Bay area. These two developments, along with the island’s status as an ecological reserve prompted the Seri to move to the mainland to communities such as Desemboque and Punta Chueca. Selling handcrafts, including baskets and jewelry as well as the carvings, has become a vital source of income.[4] The first ironwood carver was Jose Astorga, who began by carving animals of pumice stone. His first work with ironwood is utilitarian, bowls, spoons, etc. His first decorative items were created between 1963 and 1964, focusing on sea animals that were popular with tourists. His daughter later became the first to sign her work.[4] Commercial wax and other sanding methods were introduced in 1968. That same year, University of Arizona students began to make monthly trips to the Seri villages to buy the carvings, greatly increasing their popularity.[4] In the 1970s, the Mexican government began to promote and widely distribute the carvings leading to about half of the adult population engaged in the craft.[3][4] Non Seris began carving in the 1970s, as the popularity of the craft grew, and introduced motorized cutting and carving methods in the 1980s as well as carving of animals not part of the Seri world.[3][4] In 1974, BANFOCO became a carving wholesaler with the aim of providing the Seris with a regular income.[4] In the 1980s, distribution extended into Canada and Japan.[3] The growth of the craft however, along with continued use of the wood for charcoal, started to decrease the supply of wood. In 1994 the ironwood tree became protected by the Mexican government, allowing its use only for carving.[3] By this time, the craft had spread into various parts of Sonora as well as the Baja California peninsula.[4] However, most ironwood carving is still done in Kino Bay, Caborca, Magdalena de Kino, Punta Checa, Puerto Libertad, Puerto Peñasco, Santa Ana and Sonoyta.[3] The scarcity of the wood has caused its price to rise and production to fall. This in turn has made already existing pieces more valuable.[4] Prices left to right: Duck - $40 Elk - $75 Moose - $75 Deer - $75 Ram 1 - $75 Ram 2 - $75 Bear - $75 Eagle - $100 Quail -- $50 3rd from the left is a moose, and the bear has a fish in its mouth Prices below: Bear -$15 Roadrunner - $30 The one on the right is the roadrunner Smaller duck - $30 Scorpion -- $50 TM List
  21. Outdoor Writer

    $$$ IRONWOOD CARVINGS ANYONE???

    These are all still available due to a couple premature ejaculations. 🙄 I'm going to take a some better individual photos with measurements over the next few days.
  22. Want to see what your guns cost 50+ years ago? These are the books that will show you the prices. They also contain dozens upon dozens of articles by some of the most noted writers of the times. See my replies to this message for the Table of Contents for each volume. Each book is in good to excellent condition and haven't been off my book shelves for decades. I will consider reasonable offers but no trades. Payment via PayPal (buyer doesn't need an acct; just a CC or checking acct.) or cash only. Must be picked up near 67th Ave. & Camelback in Glendale, AZ or shipped at buyer's expense. ($4 ea. or less for multiple) $25 ea. Now $20 ea. Gun Digest, 1965 19th Annual Edition, edited by John Amber. Paperback manual with 384 pages, published by The Gun Digest Company. Articles, by Serven, Amber, Waters, Lachuk, Hagel, Swiggett, Bell and others. Gun Digest: 1966-20th Anniversary Edition , edited by John Amber. Paperback 416 pg. with illustrations, 32 pg.. in full color, photographs and feature stories throughout. Gun Digest, 30th Anniversary 1976 Deluxe Edition, edited by John T. Amber. All-new technical articles by top firearms Authorities. The complete gun book, comprehensive and detailed, for all shooters-hunters, handgunners, riflemen and shotgunners, collectors, handloaders, and law enforcement officers. IIllustrated. 448 pages with index. Gun Digest 32nd Anniversary 1978 Deluxe Edition, edited by John T. Amber. All new technical articles by top gun experts. New product evaluations. Field tests. Technical data. Latest specifications and prices on all available rifles, shotguns, handguns and accessories. 447 pg. with lots of illustrations. TM List
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