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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/06/2022 in all areas

  1. 50 points
    I’ve spent a lot of time and money the last 5-10 years hoping to kill a big coues deer with my bow.. with the camera ban it seemed like it definitely wasn’t going to happen. The heat wave the last week I figured sitting water would pay off so I spent 5 days on tank with the most sign in the area hoping it would pay off and it did. This buck came in completely silent and by himself at 38 yards. He started broadside when I shot and nearly turned 90 degrees by the time the arrow reached him but it went in at a good angle and caught his vitals and ended in his spine. I knew he was big but couldn’t believe my eyes when I saw how heavy he was..
  2. 43 points
    Have 3 tags for my kids. 2 in 5bsouth 1 in 6a. Bugles have shut off by 7am in both units. All the big herd bulls we are seeing have 20 to 40 cows with them. We got lucky with one small 6x6 so far that split from the herd bull and his cows and called him into 46yds and he made his arrow count on his 1st archery bull. Bull went 15yds and was down. 2 more tags to fill. Hopefully its kicks in a litter better. Good luck everyone
  3. 25 points
    I lost my bugle tube on Friday evening in unit 8 it fell off my pack on a road by Wagoner Hill. Whoever found it put it on a rock about 6” tall in the middle of the Jeep trail we were on. Needless to say I found it Sunday evening. If whoever found it is on this site I would like to give a big thanks to them. They could have easily kept it, but to put in the middle of the road for me to find it was awesome. Not an expensive item, but very cool to have got it back. Again a big thanks to you if you on on this site!!!
  4. 23 points
    We found this buck 2 months from opening day, then we found him a month later in the same spot. Night before the hunt he was back. Opening morning we had a little trouble finding him, coyotes were chasing the herd all around, one lone doe seemed to be following us, then she started running and 23 ears and 1 set of horns appeared over a knoll- dropped then crawled about 50 yds, an old ant hill provided a shooting lane without grass in the way. Shot was at 7:01 am - hunt over. I don't now much about antelope - I am very fortunate to have good friends help me - The hot scouting trips and helping the day of the hunt. Also appreciate all the help CWT members shared and offered! Great time- need some draw luck to have another tag in AZ- can't wait for Wyoming / Utah and New Mexico someday.
  5. 19 points
    Don't post a whole lot here, but lurk around a lot and thanks to all the info everyone has provided has helped me out a ton with AZ hunting. Started out hunting from treestands back in Virginia so learning western hunting has been a long work in progress for me. *Disclaimer- this is a long story of a newbie’s first elk hunt- no bulls were killed so sorry no pics but just thought I’d share my hunt experience: So got drawn early archery 6A bull with 6 points this year and had been stoked all year about this hunt. This was my first ever elk hunt in Arizona during the rut so wasn't sure what to expect. Did some scouting in July, found what seemed like a good spot to hunt loaded with elk in the northern part of the unit where I was able to hike in and get away from all the roads and Razors/SxS's and quads. Ended up having to hunt the opening weekend b/c of the way things fell with work and family obligations (wanted to do the 2nd week but oh well). Got up to the area I wanted to camp Thursday evening before the opener. Brought my bike so I could ride in quietly up this super rough road that would take my truck forever to crawl up. Day 1 Woke up at 4 got packed up and rode out to where I wanted to go and hike in off the road at least a mile and try to listen for bugles/locate elk. Well about a half mile down the road my bike chain gets caked up with mud and snaps the gear shifting thing on the back wheel in half, so much for that plan. I pull my bike off the road as a quad is coming behind me full speed and stash it behind a tree. As I am trying to see if I can fix it in the dark I start to hear bugles off in the distance. I say screw the bike and I start heading towards the bugling, still waiting on first light. After hiking in circles chasing multiple bugles for about an hour and a half I realize that these bugles are not necessarily elk, they are other hunters calling like crazy. I stop chasing the bugles and decide to hike to the area I wanted to initially get to that was far from any roads and get away from all these other hunters that won't stop bugling. I bump into about 3 other hunters on the way but finally get some distance from roads and it is quiet. I bump into a cow while still hunting, she spots me immediately and trots off in the other direction. I realize I need to slow down and that these cow elk can pick up movement extremely well. I stay out all day and don't hear any bugles once I left the area that was packed with hunters. Bumped into a spike still in velvet with two cows, the one cow stood in front of the spike, so didn't have a shot, but didn't want to shoot him anyway as he looked the size of a calf. The other cow had me pegged anyways so couldn't move from my position without getting busted. Hiked back to camp and bumped into two more cows in the evening and again, they had me immediately as soon as I got within about 80 yards and ran off. Again I am realizing how difficult it is to move in on these animals. Day 2 Not having my bike, I get up earlier and hike the extra 2 miles into my roadless area I want to hunt. On the way I bump into another spike with cows that seem to be fleeing a crazed hunter that won't stop bugling at them. This guy was literally bugling every 5 minutes and I could tell it didn't sound like a real elk. Anyways, I try to get close to the spike for a shot but get busted again just outside bow range by the cows. I continue to the roadless area. As I am walking in quietly on top of a small ridge I hear something coming below me. I get down on a knee to lower my profile as it sounds like a group of elk trotting fast towards me. I pop my head up for a split second to see if I can locate them and right away I see the head of a cow elk starting right at me, already caught my slight movement. With that, they start to bolt away, they are maybe at 50 yards. I see about 9 cow elk pass, what looks like at least a 5x5 running at the back comes by, I draw my bow quickly but it was impossible to get on a running bull elk at 50 yards, so much for that encounter. I am starting to get pretty hyped up though about seeing elk especially getting that close to a bull. I slowly still hunt the rest of the day about 3 miles through the woods back to camp. Right a sunset, I bump into a good size bull probably a 6x6 out in the open at about 120 yards with about 10 cows. I slowly try to get my pack off my back and get set up for a stalk, immediately busted by one of the cows catching my movement, they run off. I continue on my slow still hunt and it is almost dark. About ¼ mile later, I glass up another nice bull by himself at about 100 yards. I duck behind a pine tree and again take my pack off to try to get close. Then I think well, stalking hasn’t work well at this point so let me try my cow call to get him to come close to me. I hit my cow call twice and I thought they sounded like good calls but the bull didn’t and he bolted off at the sound of it. At this point I realize these elk are totally averse to any type of calling due to all the hunting pressure. I make it back to camp feeling frustrated but also stoked about all my encounters. Day 3 I get my friend who drove up to camp for the night to drive my to the roadless area well before dawn, saving me 2 miles of hiking. I hike in the dark about a half mile from the road and start hearing bulges and these sound like real deep sounding, legit bugles, not other hunters. I slowly move into the continuing bugles as the sun starts to come up. I can hear them and I know they are close so I drop my pack to prepare for a stalk, this sounds like a huge herd. I slowly move in glassing every few steps into the pines and see multiple elk but the cows see me again and they slowly move away from me. The bugles are non-stop at this point so I know where they are and can gauge what direction the herd is heading. I move fast to try to cut them off and get ahead of them. After about another half mile of hiking I am set up in a good ambush spot and I hear the bugles getting closer. I move very slow, taking a step, glassing into the pines and listening. I spot a nice bull in my binos and he looks to be about 90 yards just slowly feeding and staying in generally one spot, it is either a 5x5 or 6x6. I decide this time I am not going to get busted and will belly crawl into bow range. I slowly crawl about foot at a time with my binos, range finder, and bow dragging the ground bumping into the millions of rocks that are all over the ground in 6A. I slowly peak up and get my eyes back on the bull, a 2nd bull starts feeding near him as well about the same size. I think I am at a decent bow range so I attempt to range him but my range finder is all fogged up can’t see anything. I lose sight of the bull while trying to wipe to fog off my range finder lens. I saw screw it and I get up on one knee to try to see where he went- bam, there he is, staring straight at me broadside, I nervously range him through my foggy rangefinder, it reads 62 yards. I feel like that is an easy shot for me as I had been practicing out to 80 yards all summer. I draw my bow and put my 60 yard pin just behind his shoulder, middle of the body height-wise and release thinking it was a solid shot. Too my horror, and seemed like in slow motion, the arrow sails high about 1 inch over his back. I couldn’t believe I blew the shot, 60 yards was automatic for me on my practice range, what the heck? Was my range finder off? Did I accidentally range a tree behind him? I’ll never know. So anyways the bulls run off along with the rest of the heard I can hear them moving off in the distance, not at a run though, just a medium paced walk. They are still bugling like crazy (this is about 830 am at this point). I sit there distraught about my missed shot and ponder whether I should walk back to my pack I dropped about a mile away at this point. I still hear crazy amounts of bugling in the distance and so I decide I will continue to chase this heard. I move fast again to try to cut them off once again. I get to a relatively open area and spot two lead bulls coming in towards me with the rest of the heard behind them. I drop to my belly and slowly crawl up to a large deadfall for cover. The bulls are slowly moving in and I decide this is my 2nd chance. I am ready to draw and I range them, 80 yards. I decide to let them move in close before I shoot. All of a sudden they stop and turn direction and walk into some thicker pines out of range. What the heck again? They couldn’t see me, wind shift maybe? The herd continues to move slowly and I parallel them about 200 yards away attempting to move faster and catch up to cut them off yet again. At this point I can see the full size of this heard as they cross an open area, there is a continuous stream of cows and bulls moving at a walking pace and they just keep going and going, there must have been close to 150 elk in this heard, maybe 20-30 bulls. I try again and again to get close enough into bow range but can’t seem to get in closer than 100 yards without being spotted and the herd moving off. I do this for almost two more miles and can’t ever get close enough for a shot. I am now about 3.5 miles from my pack with no water at it is like 11am. I decide I need to regroup, get water and rest as I am getting very reckless and sloppy trying to stalk in on these elk. I start the long walk back to my pack and thunderstorms start to roll in. It starts pouring rain and visibility drops (don’t have any rain gear either as that was left in my pack also). The rain seemed to make the elk go even more wild as I hear bulges going crazy again and I keep bumping into elk off in the distance. I try again once more to get close to a bull with about 5 cows in the pouring rain. I move in slowly thinking the rain will hide any noise and movement but busted by a cow again, they move off just out of bow range again. I continue to run into elk and hear bugles until the rain stops after about an hour. I finally make it back to my pack in shock of the amount of elk I just encountered. I take a break and still hunt the rest of the evening, running into a spike with two cows but again, can’t get close enough for a bow shot. Day 4 Have to leave this day due to work and family constraints, was thinking about not hunting and just packing up and going home. I decide I have to give this hunt my all so I wake up early and decide to hunt a half day and check out an area north of camp that looked good on the satellite imagery. Right at first light about ¼ mile from camp I have a two cows move in towards me, I have them at 40 yards and I stay still, they never see me, no bulls follow though. I move into a small canyon thick with pines very slowly. (I have learned that if I think I am moving slow, I need to move even slower). I take 2-3 steps, listen, and glass, repeat. I start to hear bugling off in the distance. I move in very slow as the bugles get louder and I make out some antlers off in the distance through my glass. It is a nice bull either 5x5 or 6x6 moving towards my position. I very slowly crouch down to hide my silhouette behind a large rock in front of me. The bull must have caught my slight movement and stops, staring right at me for about 5 minutes. I think he is at about 60 yards away at this point but I don’t want to risk ranging him as he would pick up on that extra movement. After staying motionless for a few more minutes, he decides to turn broadside to me and begins to walk off down the canyon. I decide this is my only shot at this bull so I draw my bow, no time to range him. He stops and stares at me broadside giving me a perfect shot opportunity. I feel like this bull is at 60 yards so I again level the 60 yard pin right where it needs to go and let the arrow fly knowing that there is no way I can miss a second time. To my shock and horror once again, the arrow flies about an inch over his back and he trots off over to the other side of the canyon. He stops back to stare at me some more at about 150 yards. I collapse on the ground in disappointment and disbelief that I have missed two shots on bull elk that took 6 years of applying to get this tag. The bull casually moves over the top of the ridge and I figure why not try an move quickly to get in front of him again. I give him some space and circle up to the top of the ridge he went over. As I crest the ridge I spot a cow elk moving right towards me. I freeze and lean against a pine, she doesn’t notice me. Before I know it, I have 8 cow elk surrounding me feeding on top of this ridge, one decides to bed down. I stand motionless for about 20 minutes while they are within 20 yards of me. One of the cows gets a little suspicious of me and starts staring at me. Just them I see another elk moving in behind some brush, I see antlers and velvet hanging off, another bull! He was at about 40 yards but no shot because of brush in the way and one of the cows staring right at me. I can’t believe I am this close to a bull within 25 minutes of just missing that other one. I get nervous and my legs start shaking from standing still for so long. No matter how hard I try and can’t get my legs to stop shaking and the cow elk picks up on the movement, alerting the rest to my presence and they quickly walk off the ridge down to the canyon below. Hunted the rest of the morning then had to pack up and head back down to the desert for work. I couldn’t believe the amount of elk I encountered on this hunt and it was a blast. I also am so pissed at myself for missing two shots that I felt like I should have been automatic at based on all the practice I did before the hunt. Thankful for a great experience up in the pines that was the best hunt I’ve ever had, but also the worst hunt ever with those two misses. Hoping to get back up there again before the season ends!
  6. 19 points
    IMG_2331.MP4 IMG_2332.MP4
  7. 19 points
    Had a great season. Went out 3 times. Birds flew good but not as great as last year. Had a bbq with all the buddies. soaked birds in buttermilk over night, rinsed, added salt, pepper, garlic. Put a piece of green chile and bacon. Put on traeger at 300 for about hr. Came out great.
  8. 16 points
    Those were guides.
  9. 14 points
    Looking through my old posts and came across this.... Almost seven years ago! We still have Cleo. She is family.... And yes, she does have a partner in crime.
  10. 13 points
    Maybe we just do away with guilds and go back to hunting for fun? And if you “didn’t have time to scout “ it’s because your just not that into hunting
  11. 11 points
    This year I again get the priviledge to go as a helper on two different sheep hunts up here in Oregon. Both of the hunts are in big river canyons, the Deschutes and the John Day. Here is the story of the first one..... Got this ram opening morning. There was a group of three rams that were hanging out right by the river that had two good rams. They were the best rams we had seen through multiple scouting trips. We decided to make a move on them opening morning, so I was sitting on them an hour before daylight. When it got light we got them located and made a game plan to get in range. Trevor and Hunter (tag holder) kayaked across the river and started climbing a ridge. My son Tate and I stayed on the access road where we had a good view of the rams and watched them bed down. Trevor had lost where they were and thought he and Hunter were a lot closer to the rams then they actually were. Thinking the rams were only 2-3 hundred yards down the hill, Trevor started looking over the rock outcrop they were standing on. The rams, being about 5 hundred yards, immediately spotted him skylined looking over the rocks. Up they got and away they went! Tate and I jumped in our vehicle and followed them around the hillside. They were on the end of a big ridge so all Hunter and Trevor needed to do was hop over ridge and they were able to keep track of them for a little while but lost them when they dropped into small side canyon. Tate and I had them all the way and climbed up the opposite side of the main canyon to get enough elevation to keep track of them as they came out of that side canyon and went up another, finally stopping and began feeding again about a 1/2 mile further up into a bowl. I radioed to Trevor and told him I had them located and they had finally stopped. He replied back and said “ yeah, we’re right on top of them waiting for the big one to stand up.”. I was completely confused, how could they have gotten that far down the main ridge to get above the bowl that fast? Then it hit me... they were on the wrong sheep! I jumped back on the radio and said “Trevor, I think your looking at the wrong rams!”. This time he was confused, he asked “are you sure? I saw those rams go right here and I think the big one is lying right below us!”. I told him I was sure, but if they were sitting on a big ram to really look him over because now we had options! After close to an hour of sitting and changing positions trying to get a better vantage point, I finally saw the ram they were looking at stand up. They were right, he was a good ram that carried his mass really well! While I was looking him over, I saw him jump then heard the crack of the rifle! The ram didn’t look hit but he ran about 50 yards sidehilling down and away from them then stopped and looked back. This time I saw the ram bow his head and short stepped straight downhill before loosing his feet and tumbling to the bottom of the draw at the report on the rifle. 1st ram down, and it has gotten me excited for next months hunt! ning morning. There was a group of three rams that were hanging out right by the river that had two good rams. They were the best rams we had seen through multiple scouting trips. We decided to make a move on them opening morning, so I was sitting on them an hour before daylight. When it got light we got them located and made a game plan to get in range. Trevor and Hunter (tag holder) kayaked across the river and started climbing a ridge. My son Tate and I stayed on the access road where we had a good view of the rams and watched them bed down. Trevor had lost where they were and thought he and Hunter were a lot closer to the rams then they actually were. Thinking the rams were only 2-3 hundred yards down the hill, Trevor started looking over the rock outcrop they were standing on. The rams, being about 5 hundred yards, immediately spotted him skylined looking over the rocks. Up they got and away they went! Tate and I jumped in our vehicle and followed them around the hillside. They were on the end of a big ridge so all Hunter and Trevor needed to do was hop over ridge and they were able to keep track of them for a little while but lost them when they dropped into small side canyon. Tate and I had them all the way and climbed up the opposite side of the main canyon to get enough elevation to keep track of them as they came out of that side canyon and went up another, finally stopping and began feeding again about a 1/2 mile away up into a bowl. I radioed to Trevor and told him I had them located and they had finally stopped. He replied back and said “ yeah, we’re right on top of them waiting for the big one to stand up.”. I was completely confused, how could they have gotten that far down the main ridge to get above the bowl that fast? Then it hit me... they were on the wrong sheep! I jumped back on the radio and said “Trevor, I think your looking at the wrong rams!”. This time he was confused, he asked “are you sure? I saw those rams go right here and I think the big one is lying right below us!”. I told him I was sure, but if they were sitting on a big ram to really look him over because now we had options! After close to an hour of sitting and changing positions trying to get a better vantage point, I finally saw the ram they were looking at stand up. They were right, he was a good ram that carried his mass really well! While I was looking him over, I saw him jump then heard the crack of the rifle! The ram didn’t look hit but he ran about 50 yards sidehilling down and away from them then stopped and looked back. This time I saw the ram bow his head and short stepped straight downhill before loosing his feet and tumbling to the bottom of the draw at the report on the rifle. 1st ram down, and it has gotten me excited for next months hunt! He ended up scoring out at 174 with 3 inches of deductions for 171 (unofficial until the 30 day drying period of course).
  12. 9 points
    With hunting season starting to kickoff I thought I would share a few mounts I recently finished up. Good luck to all! 👍
  13. 9 points
    Little hike by the house tonight.......they're pretty vocal. Can't believe nobody is hunting them. IMG_3891.MOV
  14. 8 points
    I was truly blessed again this year being able to take this buck. I had actually passed this buck up 2 years ago waiting for something bigger ( still kicking myself). He is actually not much bigger than 2 years ago, but did add a small point off his G2. I sat in my stand for 35 hours before this guy made his appearance. That is the only good thing that will come out of the trail cam ban... not knowing what's coming in, I wasn't waiting for a "bigger buck".
  15. 8 points
    DONE! Photography of Coues Deer and Other Wildlife - CouesWhitetail.com Discussion forum Sort of just did it without checking-in with the head-honcho, but I think she would be OK with it.
  16. 8 points
    My son has a 5BS tag- on opening day - good bugles in the morning - son had a 6x6 at 40 but he feed the wrong way (towards us, busted us ) had a spike at 15 yds (pass) chased a few more - shut down at 7:30 am. In the afternoon two guys beat us to our water hole and shot a bull (we set up our blind in the morning but they sat in a natural blind- they alerted us as we were walking in , we backed out and they killed- we heard the crashing). few bugles right at dark. Saturday - sparse bugles in the morning - managed to get 60 yds from a nice bull but needed to close the final 10 and got busted- bulls shut down around 7, but it began to rain and they started again, once the rain stoped the bulls stopped. ABSOLUTELY NOTHING SAT night - not a peep - we ran into 3 groups of hunters around Pine MTN- one of the worst evenings ever- and I have had some terrible evenings... Sunday (this) morning- decent bugles, we were in the cedars - got close to a bull but no shot - then the elk moved on. later we ran into 2 sets of hunters. We came home - my son is a is a freshman at UA can't miss but one class and we chose next week as the one class to miss. Mosquitoes are absolutely horrible - opening day I wore one layer and they bit me through my hat and shirt, applied 100% deet -as I sweated it must of washed off- torn us UP! I probably was bit 100 times... no joke. Sat and today wore two shirts and carried bug spray with me and sprayed it on multiple times. We will be up Thursday and will have 4-5 days to get one down. Good luck
  17. 8 points
    "The wilderness; I've never been lost, but I was mighty turned around for three days once." Daniel Boone
  18. 8 points
  19. 8 points
    Had a Great hunt! 2 weeks ago my dad got a call from azgfd saying someone turned in a tag and he was next in line. They called on a Friday evening and said he needed to let them know Monday morning. We drove up to the unit and started a frantic search to see what we could turn up. We found several decent bucks so he opted to take the tag. The fallowing weekend we found this buck. He spent all this last week patterning this buck in the mornings and evenings. Opening morning dgaf Cwt and I were glassing while my dad was in there normal path, however the buck didn’t fallow the script and did something completely different than normal. My dad did stalk in however he chose not to take a walking shot do to range. That evening Dgaf Cwt and I were joined by my 4 year old Quinley. We spotted the buck and after some crazy rut activity from the buck chasing does and gathering more, we were able to guide him into position. He took the 170 yard shot and hit him right in the pump house! This buck has some crazy mass all the way up! Such a fun experience thanks Dgaf Cwt for your help.
  20. 7 points
    Well, I guess we can all make an educated assumption now about why he was such a successful "guide". Baiting game animals for profit should be a lifetime ban, IMO.
  21. 7 points
  22. 7 points
    I wanted to give an update since it seems nobody ever does after asking for help on a hunt. Anyways, I didn’t kill a coues. Saw a lot of mulies, a lot of elk. Was relieved and a bit surprised I only saw hunters on the road. While I was out hiking and glassing I didn’t see anybody. If I was to do this again, I would spend more time north and I would hunt bears with the idea that I’d shoot a deer if I happen to get a chance.
  23. 7 points
    I don’t have Instagram but I was sent this photo telling me I’ll be measuring one in 60 days….ha. I guess so. That’s a big bull for a straight 6x6.
  24. 6 points
    With some paperwork done, I headed north to the Grand Canyon yesterday as the forecast had lightning that afternoon and evening. No lightning, but a fair sunset. Image was shot from Yavapai Point on the south rim. Camped that night about a mile behind Tusayan outside of GCNP, and three bulls were bugling a little about 9pm. Clouds and rain were in the canyon the next morning, but no lightning despite the forecast. I could have tagged a cow and calf elk this morning if I had been driving 6 feet faster. That got the heart pumping.
  25. 6 points
    I bet the lack of bugles has more to do with the hoard of people that have rolled in in the last few days that It does the moon
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