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Mangum

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About Mangum

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 07/14/1981

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  • Yahoo
    ewmangum@yahoo.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Snowflake

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  1. Mangum

    His days were numbered

    I'll try to stay out of your way 😉
  2. Mangum

    His days were numbered

    No it was in the morning about 9:00am. It was really over cast that day. I was sitting on a little puddle of a seep that always seems to have about the same amount of water no matter how dry it is. It was really getting hammered this year with how dry is been.
  3. Someone on here may recognize this buck. Someone made a pass through neck shot on this buck that by some miracle didn't hit anything vital. The wound was actually healing up nicely. Anyway, he wasn't so fortunate with me...
  4. Mangum

    2020 Archery OTC Coues

    Looks like being a respectful hunter paid off for you. Congrats on an outstanding buck.
  5. Mangum

    First day velvet success...

    I wasn't there but I can see it going down in my mind. That will have to do for now. At least until Saturday. Great buck man. Congrats.
  6. Well I haven't been able to get away from work to do any hunting this season yet but I did finally get the buck that I killed last year back from the taxidermist.So now Alfred has his good buddy Tiny Tim to "hangout" with.
  7. Mangum

    Done...

    Masterfully done. Congrats!
  8. Mangum

    First archery buck!

    Heck yeah! That's awesome!
  9. Is been nine long years since I got to kill one of these little guys. Delicious Ahh yes the story. My brother and I found this buck during the January hunt but were not able connect. The does he was with kept him safe. I knew the area pretty well and with some pre season scouting I found that the acorn crop was going to be a good one. So I found an area that was thick with oak trees and had trails crisscrossing all through it. In that thicket there was a perfect pine tree to climb with my tree stand. My plan was to stake out that ticket with the hopes that he would feed through there. Opening morning came high with anticipation. That anticipation and excitement got me into my stand with an hour plus to wait for it to get light. As I sat there I had a most magnificent view of the stars, one that only comes with truly being in the middle of nowhere. The view was especially good because there was no moon as well. I was snapped back into reality from my contemplative moment by the fact that I was freezing. On the way to my stand I had pushed a little too hard and sweated more than I would have liked. Because of this, 50 degree temps and little to no natural insulation I started to shiver uncontrollably and the sun was still two hours away from being up. It was miserable but I tufted it out until 6:30 when I caught site of movement off to the right. A spike was slowly feeding his way into the thicket I was in. It took him quite a while but finally he was 15 yards in front of me. So I slowly brought my bow up and came to full draw while he had his head down vaccuming up acorns. When I had the perfect broadside shot I put my 20 yard pin low on his chest just behind his shoulder and pushed on the back of my release trigger. Then I let down my draw. All the while he had no clue that I was there. He never did leave the area but fead and bedded there all day. Along about 9:30 the sun hit me directly and as I warmed up my body relaxed, my head fell forward resting on the front rail of my tree stand and it was lights out for about 30 minutes. I woke up to the rustling of leaves and four forked horns feeding about 60 yards out. They were joined by another spike and a doe. At one point one of the forked horns was 18 yards out so I drew on him settled my 20 yard pin on his body and just behind his shoulder, pushed on the back of my realeses trigger and let down my draw. I figured this was good practice for when the moment of truth came. Finally at about 1:30 the fact that I only had opening week end to hunt, the rest of the time being already scheduled for other family events. I decided to just shoot one of the forked horns to put some meat in the freezer. I had three of them off to my left so I slowly brought my range finder up. First one 18 yards, second 25 yards, third 27 yards. The he biggest of the three was at 25 yards and I decided I was going to take him. So I pocket my range finder and slowly raised my bow. As I'm waiting for the right moment to draw from out of nowhere out steps the deer that I had been waiting and hoping for. He stepped right in between two spots that I had ranged earlier. Since he was between 19 and 23 yards as soon as he turned his head to look at one of the forked horns I came to full draw and settled my 20 yard pin just behind his shoulder. When he dropped his head to eat one last acorn I touched off my release and watched as the red and white fletching of my arrow disappeared in his vitals. Like lightning he bolted out of there ran 50 yards and stopped then after taking a couple of backwards steps he kneeled down then slowly rolled over to his side, one kick with his front leg then two kicks with his back legs and he went still. I've heard of people getting the shakes after killing a buck it had never happened to me before. As the reality of what had just happened washed over me I realized that my knees were shaking quite uncontrollably that affect continued upward until my whole body was shaking so badly I thought I was going to drop my bow. So I sat down for a few minutes to regain my composure. Shortly after that I was on the ground and slowly walking up to my deer. About 10 yards from him I stopped to take a good look at him. It was sad to see him laying there like that but I was truly grateful that God had blessed me with the opportunity to harvest this buck. The memory and image of that moment will forever be burned into my mind. After I had given him the moment of respect that was his I began carefully de-boning and making the most use of all the meat that was there. With a pack full of meat his cape and head and my bow in hand I was probably carrying atleast half my body weight if not more. The treck to my car was more than exhausting. When I did finally reach my vehicle I loaded up and headed for home. I would have to come back later to get my stand I just didn't have anything left in me. Anyway that's about it. Hope you all enjoy. If someone is able to hack my post and flip these pics I would appreciate it. I've tried everything I can think of but they never end up setting the right way.
  10. Mangum

    fur friendly load

    I love handloading ammo. I loaded up 40 .308 brass with 27 gr of imr 4198 behind a 110 gr sierra varmintor. I havn't shot them through a crono or anything but my guess is they are traveling at about 1800 feet per second. It's awesome. My .308 now kicks about like a .223 and does about the same damage. My brother and I went out to see if we could feed one of them to a coyote. At about 5:30 we acomplished just that and to mine and my brothers surprise fur damage was very light. Here are a couple of pics to show our success.
  11. Mangum

    fur friendly load

    My wife and I were just reading this post together. lol. no I think my wife is rotfl. It's funny you say that because the smallest squares that my wife has used has been one and a half inch squares. I don't know if I want to go that small on this project though! even halves might be too small:) I am loading up some 110gr sierras today. I will let you all know how they work.
  12. Mangum

    fur friendly load

    Since I posted I've done some more reading and you are right, a v-max will probably destroy what ever I shot with them. I might give those tsx's a try. The reason I want the furs is I am trying to do a little project with them. My wife loves to sew and quilt. So we want to get some tanned and try to make a fur quilt out of them. I don't know we'll see how it goes.
  13. Well I do not have the money to spend on a .223 right now so I am trying to turn my .308 into a fur fiendly rifle. I did some reasearch in different reloading manuals and on-line. I think I have come up with what might be an okay load. It is a 110 grain v-max infront of 27 grains of IMR 4198. This load will give me about 2000 feet per second and about 800 foot punds of energy. point blank range will be about 200 yards. If the coyote is farther than that then I probably won't be able to hit him anyway. What do you all think. Will it be very fur friendly? Has anyone ever tried something like this before with success?
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