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Cabeza de Vaca - cow head......?

 

I found the remnants of an elk antler by a cliff dwelling in the Sierra Ancha's, very little of it left but based on where it came from an elk did not hide out there and drop it.

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Cabeza de Vaca - cow head......?

 

I found the remnants of an elk antler by a cliff dwelling in the Sierra Ancha's, very little of it left but based on where it came from an elk did not hide out there and drop it.

 

Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca was a member of a 400-man expedition sent to Florida in 1528. Only four survived. They traveled across the Gulf of Mexico in crude boats they built themselves, reached Galveston Island, and were captured by Indians and enslaved. After escaping, they began walking westward, and eight years later met up with other Spaniards near what now is Culiacan, Sinaloa. Some say they crossed southern New Mexico and Arizona, others say they traveled farther south. It is an incredible story of survival. Anyone interested in the history of our region needs to read the various books about Cabeza de Vaca and this amazing journey.

 

Ditto for the Coronado Expedition. Francisco Vasquez Coronado led some 300 conquistadores, more than 1,000 Indians, a few monks, and some slaves from deep into Mexico all the way to Kansas and back, searching for the seven golden cities of Cibola that a Spanish priest (Frey Marcos de Niza) claimed he had seen. The expedition crossed the Mogollon Rim and White Mountains, then followed the Zuni River to the Zuni pueblos. Scouting parties "discovered" the Grand Canyon. Some of the things about this expedition that I find most interesting: galleons were sent up the Colorado River from the Gulf of California to below what now is Kingman, hoping to resupply the expedition; Indian tribes sent word up and down the river that the Spaniards were present; everyone was close to starving when they reached Vernon, some died after eating toxic plants, but the others were saved by eating antelope they killed near St. Johns; scribes wrote about each day's trek and regularly sent dispatches back to Spain about the expedition's progress.

 

You also may want to read about the more recent punitive expedition into Mexico after Pancho Villla in 1916-17, and some of the many books about the Apaches in Arizona, New Mexico and northern Mexico. The Southwest has a rich history that is not taught in our schools, unfortunately.

 

Incidentally, I don't think an elk antler would survive above ground, exposed to weather and rodents for the 400-500 years or more after those ruins were abandoned. The one you found probably was dropped within the last few decades. If you found it inside a dwelling, someone may have left it there after finding it elsewhere nearby.

 

Bill Quimby

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I read quite a bit about early Az when I first got here 25 years ago. I also enjoyed reading about the Graham/Tewksberry feud, I was spending a lot of time in that country and wanted to learn a little more. Not a good time to be a stranger just passing through.

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If you can find a copy at your library, read Man and Wildlife in Arizona -- The American Exploration Period 1824-1865 by Goode P. Davis.

 

+1

 

Bill Quimby

 

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If you can find a copy at your library, read Man and Wildlife in Arizona -- The American Exploration Period 1824-1865 by Goode P. Davis.

 

AZGFD has reprint copies of this book listed on its website for $14.95.

 

Bill Quimby

 

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Tony, we are very fortunate, here on cwt.com, to have you and Bill as a member. You guys have so much to share here. With the experience and knowledge you two have we are blessed to have all this history in our hands and I thank each of you for being our mentor historians. I am blissed to have met both of you. You guys are an encyclopedia. :)

 

TJ

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I have always been fascinated by the history in Arizona and the Southwest, and I greatly appreciate what you guys have written here.

Thanks a bunch !

 

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I have always been fascinated by the history in Arizona and the Southwest, and I greatly appreciate what you guys have written here.

Thanks a bunch !

 

You probably would interested in knowing about James Reavis, the so-called "Baron of Arizona". It was the basis for a great movie in 1950 with Vincent Price. I was a freshman in high school in Yuma, but I still remember it. Like most movies, there was more than a little exaggeration. The true story was fascinating.

 

 

Bill Quimby

 

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On 1/7/2011 at 5:51 PM, billrquimby said:

 

Do you have any photos of petroglyphs showing elk and javelinas in Arizona? I don't know of any, and that's strange. Merriam elk and javelinas should have been around in good numbers. I've found lots of rock art clearly showing deer, antelope, bighorn, and birds, but no elk or pigs. Weird.

 

Bill Quimby

There is a wash here in central AZ with some elk petroglyphs. There is also a cougar and herds of sheep. Some of the animals have long necks, and really look like lamas, but it's likely a story with a fertility metaphor. Those long neck critters are chasing tail! I'd be happy to share pictures if y'all are interested. 

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2 hours ago, Rockscout said:

There is a wash here in central AZ with some elk petroglyphs. There is also a cougar and herds of sheep. Some of the animals have long necks, and really look like lamas, but it's likely a story with a fertility metaphor. Those long neck critters are chasing tail! I'd be happy to share pictures if y'all are interested. 

Share away

 

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Wow, talk about resurrecting an old thread! 😲

I was still a lurker here back in 2010 when this was started but remember reading it. Back then a lot of good stuff was discussed on this site. Now -- not so much. A lot of the members from then have either left all together or just quit posting because of direction many of the threads now take. That's too bad. 

 

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