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SilentButDeadly

Original hunt

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wI-9RJi0Qo

 

I've heard about this before, hunting an animal to exhaustion in the heat of the African sun

 

There is a lot of scientific literature out there that points out that one of the strongest lines of evidence of human success (coupled with our enormous brain size) is our ability to out distance virtually any four legged animal on the planet.

 

Anybody ever tried this on an elk?

 

 

 

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Just imagine how they would taste after all that adrenalin buildup. I doubt the bushman would care much though!

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The Tarahumara indians down in Copper Canyon are persistence hunters, they are also probably the greatest distance runners in existence (no kidding).

 

I heard a story (no proof as to whether it is true) about how a couple of them got brought up for one of these ultra-marathons that people are doing now-a-days... Apparently the first thing they did was get drunk; second, they went to the dump and found some old tires, cut out the tread and made them into sandals; third, as they ran the race they would taunt the other competitors by running with them for several hours before dusting them, fourth, they got drunk again.

 

My guess is that a more than a few Coues down in the Sierra Madre have been run down.

 

http://www.ultralegends.com/tarahumara-indians/

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I did the train ride through Copper Canyon about 10 years ago and got to go to some of the Tarahumara villages located inside and on the rim of the canyon.. They are everything their legends say they are! They are the most running fools on this earth!

If you ever get an opprtunity to go to Copper Canyon, I highly recomend it. It is unbelievable. Some of the most remote, beautiful country on this continent.

 

I flew up the middle of Copper Canyon with a friend in his Cessna 182 in about 1970. Although it has been compared with our Grand Canyon, I felt it was not as extensive or as scenic. It reminded me of New Zealand's Whanganui Canyon, which is of similar size and also is filled with brush and trees unlike our canyon.

 

The late Felipe Wells, Arizona's first college-trained wildlife manager and an early supervisor of Coronado Memorial and Grand Canyon National Park, grew up in Copper Canyon and used to talk of shooting deer for the workers at his father's mine in Copper Canyon. I got to know him well before his suicide. His stories about his life in Copper Canyon and in early Arizona were fascinating. I especially remember him talking about being deep in Grand Canyon and seeing huge pine trees rolling down the Colorado River during floods before dams were built upstream.

 

As for the Bushmen, they are the world's best trackers bar none. I watched a Bushman track for five hours a kudu I had wounded on my first trip to Zimbabwe in 1983. He somehow knew exactly where my bull joined another bull and began traveling with it. We eventually found both bulls and I killed mine. My bullet had nicked the kudu's butt, and there were only a few drops of blood every 200 to 300 yards. How that little, dried-up brown man stayed on the same tracks in an area covered with the tracks of every kind of animal (including lots of other kudus) I will never know. I was thankful that he did. In Africa, a hunter pays full trophy fees for game wounded and lost, and I could barely afford to be there then.

 

I doubt that early Native Americans walked Coues deer down. Instead, I would think they were experts at stalking animals or waiting in hiding for them. Their bows, arrows and spears definitely were primitive, and a 30-yard shot would have been a very long one.

 

They also may have had another way of hunting game. I've seen a few long, low, hand-laid rock walls on ridges in southern Arizona that I always speculated could have been used for slowly driving deer and javelinas toward someone waiting with a bow and an arrow. I've seen several such walls, but the first that comes to mind is on top of Cerro Pelon, a small hill near Tumacacori where I used to always find a whitetail buck. Another is on the flats a mile or so north of there. Another is on one of the ridges on the south end of the Tortolitas. Someone told me of a similar wall in the Chiracahua Mountains, but I've never seen it.

 

I'm talking 30- to 36-inch-high walls, and not about the rock corrals found in a canyon of that name in the Tumacacoris or elsewhere that were built to contain livestock.

 

Let someone hide at the end of such a wall, and have a half dozen guys spread out and move slowly toward him from a mile away, and it wouldn't be long before game started drifting away from the walkers and toward the guy or guys in hiding. The trick would be to keep the animals from running and jumping the wall, and avoiding the shooter.

 

In Africa, they capture entire herds of wild animals by building temporary walls of plastic sheeting and using helicopters to drive game into holding pens and then up chutes and into trucks, so the technique works. The question is whether Arizona's early Indians used it first.

 

Bill Quimby

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They also may have had another way of hunting game. I've seen a few long, low, hand-laid rock walls on ridges in southern Arizona that I always speculated could have been used for slowly driving deer and javelinas toward someone waiting with a bow and an arrow. I've seen several such walls, but the first that comes to mind is on top of Cerro Pelon, a small hill near Tumacacori where I used to always find a whitetail buck. Another is on the flats a mile or so north of there. Another is on one of the ridges on the south end of the Tortolitas. Someone told me of a similar wall in the Chiracahua Mountains, but I've never seen it.

Bill Quimby

 

I've seen those rock walls in the Tortolitas; I'd assumed they were from a more recent rancher...

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They also may have had another way of hunting game. I've seen a few long, low, hand-laid rock walls on ridges in southern Arizona that I always speculated could have been used for slowly driving deer and javelinas toward someone waiting with a bow and an arrow. I've seen several such walls, but the first that comes to mind is on top of Cerro Pelon, a small hill near Tumacacori where I used to always find a whitetail buck. Another is on the flats a mile or so north of there. Another is on one of the ridges on the south end of the Tortolitas. Someone told me of a similar wall in the Chiracahua Mountains, but I've never seen it.

Bill Quimby

 

I've seen those rock walls in the Tortolitas; I'd assumed they were from a more recent rancher...

 

Early ranchers did use rocks to build corrals, and you can find remnants of them all over the place, but the walls I'm talking about were never corrals. They were/are single lines, several hundred yards long along the tops of ridges or near natural barriers. I can think of no other reason anyone would go to so much trouble to stack that many rocks.

 

Bill Quimby

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I have seen rock walls like you described, but never figured what they were for. Neat idea you have for them.

 

Amanda

 

They're all over southern Arizona. I can think of no other use they might have served. A rancher would not have gone to all that trouble to build just one wall and not the other three sides needed to hold his cattle.

 

Anyone have any better idea why they were built?

 

Bill Quimby

 

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