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Spicy Bluefin Poke Bowl

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Wife killed it tonight whipping up some spicy bluefin poke over rice. Incredible!

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Most important ingredient of course is some raw tuna loin cubed in bite size chunks. You also need to get the killer sushi rice. Uncle Ben's ain't going to cut it (not racist). I think the stuff Amanda got was Nishiki. Also need some chili oil and maybe some siracha for the spicy part, maybe soy sauce if you like some salt. Carrots, green onion, sesame seeds, avocado, cucumber and whatever else you want in there. We did not have any seaweed flakes or masago or anything like that but I bet that is good in there.

Spicy Tuna Recipe

 
This is the only spicy tuna recipe you will ever need! Made with simple ingredients and easy to prepare! Serve it inside sushi or hand rolls, as an appetizer or as part of a sushi bowl!
 
Prep Time15 mins
Total Time15 mins
 
Course: Appetizer, main, Snack, starter
Cuisine: Asian
Keyword: Healthy, spicy, sushi, tuna
Servings: 4
Calories: 91kcal

Ingredients

Spicy Tuna:

  • 8 oz Sashimi Grade Tuna – cut into 1/4 - 1/2'' cubes (it is easiest to dice tuna from a frozen state)
  • 1 1/2 TBS Sriracha
  • 1/2 tsp Chili Oil
  • Sea Salt , to taste
  • 1 1/2 tsp Masago (Capelin Roe)*
  • 3 small Scallions – thinly sliced, white & green parts separated
  • 1 tsp Sesame Seeds – preferably toasted (I used a combination of both Black & White sesame seeds)

Spicy Mayonnaise

  • 2 TBS Japanese Mayonnaise (preferably Kewpie brand)
  • 2 tsp Sriracha , or more to taste

For Optional Add-ins See Recipe Notes*

Instructions

  • Prepare spicy tuna sauce mixture: In a medium sized mixing bowl combine Sriracha, chili oil and a pinch of sea salt. Stir to combine well.
  • Prepare the spicy tuna: Add the tuna, masago, white parts of the scallions and sesame seeds to the bowl. Gently mix together.
  • OPTIONAL: Cover the bowl and place the spicy tuna in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to allow the flavors to marry.
  • Prepare the Spicy Mayonnaise: Combine the mayonnaise and sriracha in a small bowl. Whisk well to mix together. Taste and adjust for spiciness with more sriracha if desired..
  • Serve: Drizzle spicy mayonnaise over tuna mixture and enjoy!

Notes

  1. Masago is a type of roe from the Capelin Fish.  Small and orange in color, it is often used as a garnish for sushi.  You should be able to find Masago in the sushi section of major grocery stores.
Optional Add-in's for Sushi or Sushi Bowl: 
  • Shredded Carrots
  • Sliced Avocado
  • Crispy Nori Sheets
  • Spring Mix
  • Cooked Vermicelli Noodles
  • Cooked Sushi Rice
  • Edamame Beans
  • Sliced Cucumber
  • Imitation Crab Sticks
  • Seaweed Salad
  • Micro Greens
  • Sprouts
  • Chopped Fresh Herbs: Minto, Cilantro, Chives, Green onions
  • Diced Fruit:  Pineapple, Mango Dragonfruit
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two points from a fat man:

horseradish of any color must be available on the side

american soy sauce is no longer soy sauce.  do not use "hydrolyzed soy protein" if you like food lol.  soy sauce should be water, wheat, soybeans, salt.

dang that looks good

lee

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Looks fantastic.  I could make that Poke bowl disappear in 1 minute flat!

*For table soy sauce, I prefer La Choy.  Taste it side by side with others and see why, you can thank me later!

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3 minutes ago, Chef said:

I prefer La Choy

Chef sir-are you sure 'bout that?  i hate hijacking HEAT's thread but this is an important public service announcement.

The Japanese manufacturing process, used by companies such as Kikkoman Corp., dates to the 17th century. This so-called "natural brewing" process involves blending wheat, soybeans and a mold, and letting the culture ferment for several months before refining and bottling the sauce.

This product is produced in the United States by companies such as Kikkoman, Yamasa Corp. USA and San-J International, which has a plant in Richmond.

Best known of the U.S. brands is La Choy soy sauce (though the Japanese would disagree that this is soy sauce), owned by ConAgra Foods Inc. A La Choy spokeswoman did not respond to questions on the issue.

Food snobs and consumer groups here and in Japan consider non-brewed soy sauce an impostor since it contains caramel color, corn syrup, salt and what is called hydrolyzed soy (or some other protein), in which the protein is reduced to an amino acid to create what is essentially a flavor enhancer.

-Wall Street Journal

 

i will shut up now

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Very nice Nick.  I'm with Lee on the "gotta have some horseradish" nearby.  Tell momma I said Hi and good job! 

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2 hours ago, biglakejake said:

Chef sir-are you sure 'bout that?  i hate hijacking HEAT's thread but this is an important public service announcement.

The Japanese manufacturing process, used by companies such as Kikkoman Corp., dates to the 17th century. This so-called "natural brewing" process involves blending wheat, soybeans and a mold, and letting the culture ferment for several months before refining and bottling the sauce.

This product is produced in the United States by companies such as Kikkoman, Yamasa Corp. USA and San-J International, which has a plant in Richmond.

Best known of the U.S. brands is La Choy soy sauce (though the Japanese would disagree that this is soy sauce), owned by ConAgra Foods Inc. A La Choy spokeswoman did not respond to questions on the issue.

Food snobs and consumer groups here and in Japan consider non-brewed soy sauce an impostor since it contains caramel color, corn syrup, salt and what is called hydrolyzed soy (or some other protein), in which the protein is reduced to an amino acid to create what is essentially a flavor enhancer.

-Wall Street Journal

 

i will shut up now

You are correct in stating that La Choy isn't brewed.  I must say though, traditional soy sauce is much too salty for my taste.

I say give it a whirl, do a side by side taste test and figure which one you like best.  (for table soy, I still cook with brewed soy sauce)

 

I find it funny how some Japanese want to stay traditional when it suits them. 

While on the other hand they will sprinkle on the monosodium glutamate.

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We include French’s fried onions on ours for some crunchy contrast (not pictured)

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Just wanted to add an update, had this again last night but added a few splashes of Ponzu to the Poke and it was even better! Very pleased with our little arrangement and my wife is too. I catch it and she prepares delicious meals. Match made in heaven!

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