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Calebwalter

Frustrated newbie seeking advice

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5 minutes ago, jknister said:

Well you have good quality binos so thats a plus.  Im not in your area but this year is brutal compared to last year.  Last year I had about 10 bucks spotted here and there and would see them consistently.  This year Ive seen 2, and only once.  Keep at it.  Eventually you'll find something.

I know there are better but it’s the best that I could afford this year. Since this is my first year hunting it’s been an expensive year haha. Rifle, scope, binos, tripod, backpack etc. 

 

People I’ve asked said that because of the fires, and lack of summer rains, that the Coues deer are going to be in lower elevations looking for water. Do you think that’s true?

 

A nice lady who hinted to living at a ranch south of globe, said that she’s seen a couple deer at their cattle tanks and a boat load of coyotes. 

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2 minutes ago, Calebwalter said:

This will be my strategy on my next outing. Maybe I’ve been glassing hillsides that are too close, In the 100-300 yards away range. 
 

ive watched every meateater episode about Coues deer and Steve Rinella said something like “once you see one, and your eyes know what to look for, you will see more”. That’s what I’m hoping for, I just haven’t seen one yet...

When you’re glassing don’t look for deer.  Try to look at the ground and look at everything, picking apart every rock, look through bushes at the ground behind them, try to touch literally everything in the field if view with your eyes.  Glass in a grid pattern and pick apart everything in your field of view before you move your binos.  I only move half a FOV at a time so I essentially relook at everything.  Coues deer are remarkable at being invisible.  Often you won’t see the deer, you’ll see an ear or their nose.  I’ve found them literally bedded inside of low growing bushy junipers, I couldn’t see anything then it flicks its ear and gives itself away.  I usually will glass pretty fast at first to try to find the “obvious deer” then if you don’t find it go back to the beginning and begin your slow methodical glassing.  
 

keep in mind too that a “good spot” doesn’t necessarily have deer in it every day.  Desert deer have bigger territories than their woodland cousins do and the herds move around in their range.  You may be in a good spot and doing things right, yet there just aren’t deer there today. I’m not a rifle guy, I’ve killed all mine with a bow and arrow sitting ambushes.  I’ve had to sit for several boring days in a row before the deer moved back into the area and things got hot again.  Sometimes you get there at just the right time and it seems easy.  Other days it seems like you’re the only living thing on the planet.  That’s normal.  If you’ve got some areas that show good sign, glass those spots a few days in a row.  They might be there tomorrow if they’re not there today.  
 

I think a lot of folks give up on spots too quickly because they get discouraged and invent reasons why the deer have left: it’s too dry, I made too much noise and bumped them out, there’s too many other hunters here, etc etc etc

You gotta give a spot time to pay out.  Stay positive and be persistent.  My first deer took 14 days of hunting, and numerous blown stalks.  You just have to keep going, and then when you connect and put your hands on those antlers you’ll think, “Huh!  That wasn’t so hard....”

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3 minutes ago, mattys281 said:

When you’re glassing don’t look for deer.  Try to look at the ground and look at everything, picking apart every rock, look through bushes at the ground behind them, try to touch literally everything in the field if view with your eyes.  Glass in a grid pattern and pick apart everything in your field of view before you move your binos.  I only move half a FOV at a time so I essentially relook at everything.  Coues deer are remarkable at being invisible.  Often you won’t see the deer, you’ll see an ear or their nose.  I’ve found them literally bedded inside of low growing bushy junipers, I couldn’t see anything then it flicks its ear and gives itself away.  I usually will glass pretty fast at first to try to find the “obvious deer” then if you don’t find it go back to the beginning and begin your slow methodical glassing.  
 

keep in mind too that a “good spot” doesn’t necessarily have deer in it every day.  Desert deer have bigger territories than their woodland cousins do and the herds move around in their range.  You may be in a good spot and doing things right, yet there just aren’t deer there today. I’m not a rifle guy, I’ve killed all mine with a bow and arrow sitting ambushes.  I’ve had to sit for several boring days in a row before the deer moved back into the area and things got hot again.  Sometimes you get there at just the right time and it seems easy.  Other days it seems like you’re the only living thing on the planet.  That’s normal.  If you’ve got some areas that show good sign, glass those spots a few days in a row.  They might be there tomorrow if they’re not there today.  
 

I think a lot of folks give up on spots too quickly because they get discouraged and invent reasons why the deer have left: it’s too dry, I made too much noise and bumped them out, there’s too many other hunters here, etc etc etc

You gotta give a spot time to pay out.  Stay positive and be persistent.  My first deer took 14 days of hunting, and numerous blown stalks.  You just have to keep going, and then when you connect and put your hands on those antlers you’ll think, “Huh!  That wasn’t so hard....”

This is great advice. I’ve been looking “for deer” in general. Picking apart Every piece of the landscape seems like a more thorough way to approach it. If I’ve found beds and poop within A reasonable distance to water do you think those clues are enough to to warrant spending more time glassing that area?

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We try and aren't as bad as you would think..

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7 minutes ago, Calebwalter said:

This is great advice. I’ve been looking “for deer” in general. Picking apart Every piece of the landscape seems like a more thorough way to approach it. If I’ve found beds and poop within A reasonable distance to water do you think those clues are enough to to warrant spending more time glassing that area?

Couldn’t hurt, something left that sign behind.  I’d just pick a high enough vantage point where you can glass those areas and lots of other country at the same time. 

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Def hike an area. Its easier to glass an area all day if you've seen tracks and other sign. One thing I gauge my glassing technique is..am I seeing any small game? Birds rabbits squirrels. If I'm not I'm glassing too fast. Also change elevations and vantage points but still glass same mountain 

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4 minutes ago, AZBIG10 said:

Def hike an area. Its easier to glass an area all day if you've seen tracks and other sign. One thing I gauge my glassing technique is..am I seeing any small game? Birds rabbits squirrels. If I'm not I'm glassing too fast. Also change elevations and vantage points but still glass same mountain 

Ok. That’s a good way to judge speed!

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12 minutes ago, oz31p said:

Is haystack butte rd closed?

Yes it is. Everything between the 188 and the 60 north of globe is closed almost all the way to timber camp. I’ve called the Mesa Ranger Station and they said they have no intention of opening it until it has rained. I also talked to azgfd and they said most likely the Forest rangers will keep it closed after it rains for a short period because the risk of mudslides in areas that are freshly burned. 

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One last suggestion. While glassing survey your immediate surrounding area. Look for a good spot to set up and be ready as soon as you start glassing. Sometimes you will find a deer the moment you put your binos to your eyes

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9 minutes ago, Calebwalter said:

Yes it is. Everything between the 188 and the 60 north of globe is closed almost all the way to timber camp. I’ve called the Mesa Ranger Station and they said they have no intention of opening it until it has rained. I also talked to azgfd and they said most likely the Forest rangers will keep it closed after it rains for a short period because the risk of mudslides in areas that are freshly burned. 

Go back toward hay stack butte. Plenty of coues deer in there

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Jay Scott Outdoor Podcast has some great coues related podcast that offer a lot of advice.  Coues can be tough but fun.  I have glassed small areas all day to see one deer move.  Find a good area away from others and be patient behind the glass.  Get up early and glass as it begins to get light.

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That is arguably one if the worst hunts in the state. The deer have been pressured so much by then.

anyway there are deer in every one of those places you mentioned. Get comfortable and pick apart the hillsides. Good Luck

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1 hour ago, Calebwalter said:

I know there are better but it’s the best that I could afford this year. Since this is my first year hunting it’s been an expensive year haha. Rifle, scope, binos, tripod, backpack etc. 

 

People I’ve asked said that because of the fires, and lack of summer rains, that the Coues deer are going to be in lower elevations looking for water. Do you think that’s true?

 

A nice lady who hinted to living at a ranch south of globe, said that she’s seen a couple deer at their cattle tanks and a boat load of coyotes. 

They will be everywhere, and nowhere, at the same time.  If it was easy, everyone would be doing it.

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Try to stay 400ish yards min away from where you think deer will be. North slopes are where bucks will bed for shade. But don’t overlook the yellow grass for just finding deer. I’ve seen deer bed within 200 yds of water. And on the same hunt I have seen deer walk over a mile everyday for water. Stick with it.

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