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Couestracker

Out of state hunters

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I drive Semi to Cali. and back for work and coming back into AZ. they don't even have a Check station or stop people on I -10. I thinkits the same on I-40.  they stop some Semi's but no cars or trucks. Ya thats gonna suck as I generally have an out of state hunt every year ,Colo. this year .Yep really gonna Screw Taxidermy industry. and more hassle and $ for the Hunter...........BOB

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Anybody see when this is suppose to take affect, I didn't see it on the link?  Also would this affect bears?

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38 minutes ago, Couestracker said:

Good point, however it does mention elk and deer: "by enacting rules regarding the possession and transportation of elk and deer into Arizona "

Ah.....  Bingo!!!  Totally skimmed over that part.    I'm going with that, then!   (So I can now openly admit that I brought a pronghorn head in from New Mexico on Sunday night. ;) )

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1 hour ago, stanley said:

Ah.....  Bingo!!!  Totally skimmed over that part.    I'm going with that, then!   (So I can now openly admit that I brought a pronghorn head in from New Mexico on Sunday night. ;) )

"I had no relationship with that animal" Then you're good to go!

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Sounds like it’s time to quit hunting out of state unless you have more money than sense plus we need to support our local taxidermist as we do have some of the best in our state. 

another guestion comes to mind whom is going to patrol the borders of the neighboring states affected to make sure the sick deer 🦌 and elk don’t come into Arizona and drop dead and cause the spread of CWD 

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If you bring your deer or elk back the way most people do, boned meat, cape and a clean skull plate it doesn’t affect you in any way.  Has nothing to do with antelope or bears.  They’ve been doing this for years in almost all states east of AZ.  

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1 hour ago, 360 0r Better said:

Sounds like it’s time to quit hunting out of state unless you have more money than sense plus we need to support our local taxidermist as we do have some of the best in our state. 

another guestion comes to mind whom is going to patrol the borders of the neighboring states affected to make sure the sick deer 🦌 and elk don’t come into Arizona and drop dead and cause the spread of CWD 

Sometimes hunting out of state is the only way some people can actually hunt certain species. Like yotebuster said, doesn’t sound like a big deal. Unless your hunting a border unit and drive home with a quartered animal and whole head that you skin at home (which I’ve done) but not sure how many do that?

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I feel a bit responsible for this ...I am preparing for a moose hunt in Idaho next month. The day before this was sent out I called AZGFD to check and see if there were any reatrictions on importing carcasses.

I don’t see the big deal. Boned out meat is easier to transport and keep cool so I usually do that anyway. A cape can be dropped off with a local taxidermist to flesh and send to a tannery, capes aren’t that expensive to ship, but honestly I don’t kill many animals big enough to need a cape. If you are doing a shoulder mount then the skull cap is easy.

The complete skull is a bit more of a challenge, guess you need to take a pot big enough to boil it in. A pot big enough for a moose skull is too big for me to haul around. So I called a local taxidermist and asked for a price to do the skull, he said it should be easy enough to get done within 24 hrs of dropping it off. Regardless this is a challenge in almost any case because most big skulls don’t fit in a cooler anyway so unless you let it rot on the drive home you have to do something with it.

I am no expert, but I have educated myself a bit about CWD, and I can tell you I don’t want it in AZ. No one knows for certain how it spreads but the prions are found in the brain matter and spinal column, hence the requirement to clean skulls and debone meat. It’s likely only a matter of time before it is detected in AZ but anyway that we can slow the progression is very beneficial. CWD can have big effects on populations and it’s recommended that humans not consume CWD positive animals. Having that in the back of your mind while you are hunting would suck. Coupled with the fact that there is no known way to “decontaminate” an area once it occurs so I am all for doing anything reasonable to prevent spread of the disease. We have been very fortunate in AZ thus far and it would be great to keep it that way.

 

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Its no different than Utah's export laws on wild game. I dont get the suprise!

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17 minutes ago, Flatlander said:

I feel a bit responsible for this ...I am preparing for a moose hunt in Idaho next month. The day before this was sent out I called AZGFD to check and see if there were any reatrictions on importing carcasses.

I don’t see the big deal. Boned out meat is easier to transport and keep cool so I usually do that anyway. A cape can be dropped off with a local taxidermist to flesh and send to a tannery, capes aren’t that expensive to ship, but honestly I don’t kill many animals big enough to need a cape. If you are doing a shoulder mount then the skull cap is easy.

The complete skull is a bit more of a challenge, guess you need to take a pot big enough to boil it in. A pot big enough for a moose skull is too big for me to haul around. So I called a local taxidermist and asked for a price to do the skull, he said it should be easy enough to get done within 24 hrs of dropping it off. Regardless this is a challenge in almost any case because most big skulls don’t fit in a cooler anyway so unless you let it rot on the drive home you have to do something with it.

I am no expert, but I have educated myself a bit about CWD, and I can tell you I don’t want it in AZ. No one knows for certain how it spreads but the prions are found in the brain matter and spinal column, hence the requirement to clean skulls and debone meat. It’s likely only a matter of time before it is detected in AZ but anyway that we can slow the progression is very beneficial. CWD can have big effects on populations and it’s recommended that humans not consume CWD positive animals. Having that in the back of your mind while you are hunting would suck. Coupled with the fact that there is no known way to “decontaminate” an area once it occurs so I am all for doing anything reasonable to prevent spread of the disease. We have been very fortunate in AZ thus far and it would be great to keep it that way.

 

Completely agree. With water being an issue in our state already we don’t need another factor killing off our resources. I just don’t like the fact that to be legal, I’ll have to boil a head and debone meat if I kill it within eyesight of the az state line.

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CWD is already in AZ.  It’s in every state and has been for centuries.  They just haven’t looked hard enough for it.  Game and fish found the third deer in ND with it back in February.  About 1/2 mile from my house.  Came in and shot 52 deer off the wintering ground.  (Essentially the only deer in the area).  Of course none of them had CWD.  Completely wiped out the deer on my place for this year.  I had several 5-7 yr old bucks coming up this year too.  The game and fish is their own worst enemy when it comes to CWD.  25 years ago it hit the covers of magazines as the “end of deer hunting as we know it”.  Short of the game and fish killing off entire counties it has had ZERO impact.  Colorado went through the best years of mule deer they’ve had in a generation right in the peak of the CWD scare there.  Wisconsin and Michigan have had some of the best deer hunting in modern times (due to QDM) right in the middle of CWD’s alleged wrath.  As JayZ would say “we got 99 problems but CWD ain’t one”

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3 hours ago, stanley said:

Ah.....  Bingo!!!  Totally skimmed over that part.    I'm going with that, then!   (So I can now openly admit that I brought a pronghorn head in from New Mexico on Sunday night. ;) )

No comment....

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2 hours ago, yotebuster said:

If you bring your deer or elk back the way most people do, boned meat, cape and a clean skull plate it doesn’t affect you in any way.  Has nothing to do with antelope or bears.  They’ve been doing this for years in almost all states east of AZ.  

EXCEPT the velvet antlered portion....with ZERO facts to support this restriction. 

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17 minutes ago, yotebuster said:

CWD is already in AZ.  It’s in every state and has been for centuries.  They just haven’t looked hard enough for it.  Game and fish found the third deer in ND with it back in February.  About 1/2 mile from my house.  Came in and shot 52 deer off the wintering ground.  (Essentially the only deer in the area).  Of course none of them had CWD.  Completely wiped out the deer on my place for this year.  I had several 5-7 yr old bucks coming up this year too.  The game and fish is their own worst enemy when it comes to CWD.  25 years ago it hit the covers of magazines as the “end of deer hunting as we know it”.  Short of the game and fish killing off entire counties it has had ZERO impact.  Colorado went through the best years of mule deer they’ve had in a generation right in the peak of the CWD scare there.  Wisconsin and Michigan have had some of the best deer hunting in modern times (due to QDM) right in the middle of CWD’s alleged wrath.  As JayZ would say “we got 99 problems but CWD ain’t one”

Is there evidence that CWD has been present in AZ and everywhere else? I know some people theorize that it has always existed in wildlife populations, and there is no known genesis of the disease, but to claim it’s in this state and always has been sounds like a stretch of any data that is currently available.

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We probly do have some in this State. Why  would we be exempt when all States around us have it? Just a Guess..........BOB!

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