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Javelina: Field Care

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I've had my best tasting Javelina by processing the carcass at the kill site. Packing a whole stanking javi back to the truck can be nasty! How I do it:

 

Don't always opt for the biggest hog in the group. Carry a canvas meat bag in the pack as well as some quality rubber gloves plus a few pre-moistened kitchen wipes kept in a ziploc bag. Tag the hog on the lower leg just above the hoof. Take some pictures. Hang the carcass, skin and remove head. Don't worry about the scent gland as it comes off with the hide however minimize contact with the gland and any exposed flesh. Once skinned, stop and clean knives & gloves. Now is the time to remove hair from the carcass. Bone out the hanging carcass (the "gutless" method). Save the tagged foot! Boned out pig is only 10-15 pounds so it's an easy but more importantly, clean pack out. Do a final trim & clean at the house. BBQ, green chili, red chili, chili, all come out good. I've even slapped some straps on the grill and it was decent although somewhat tough. Javelina is best when slow cooked IMO.

 

I recommend this process to those who've been scarred trying to eat RANK javelina.

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The meat is actually really good. Most people just get scared because they way they smell and I think that gets in their heads. The meat is just that meat.

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Most people who do not eat javelina because they taste bad, have never tried javelina. They just listen to what other people tell them. We the Sheeple!

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That's how I handle all big game from 50lbs on up. Skin on site, maximum cooling potential. Bone out and put directly into game bags and pack out. Get on Ice ASAP. Final clean up at home, then package. I'll also pull the bone in quarters off on deer and elk, age them in the fridge, then bone out if possible. Hide, bone, heat and bodily fluids can ruin anything.

In TN I'd hang white tails on my basketball hoop in my yard or in my shop skin on for a day if the temp was right. But you'll rarely have that situation in the west, especially AZ.

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I've had my best tasting Javelina by processing the carcass at the kill site. Packing a whole stanking javi back to the truck can be nasty! How I do it:

 

Don't always opt for the biggest hog in the group. Carry a canvas meat bag in the pack as well as some quality rubber gloves plus a few pre-moistened kitchen wipes kept in a ziploc bag. Tag the hog on the lower leg just above the hoof. Take some pictures. Hang the carcass, skin and remove head. Don't worry about the scent gland as it comes off with the hide however minimize contact with the gland and any exposed flesh. Once skinned, stop and clean knives & gloves. Now is the time to remove hair from the carcass. Bone out the hanging carcass (the "gutless" method). Save the tagged foot! Boned out pig is only 10-15 pounds so it's an easy but more importantly, clean pack out. Do a final trim & clean at the house. BBQ, green chili, red chili, chili, all come out good. I've even slapped some straps on the grill and it was decent although somewhat tough. Javelina is best when slow cooked IMO.

 

I recommend this process to those who've been scarred trying to eat RANK javelina.

Not to detract from what you have posted, it is very good advice. I would add what I do with all game meat, AGE it as your beef steak is done before it is sold at Frys or Safeway. If I have a whole pig it is aged 18 to 21 days in a clean garbage bag in a refer set to 34 to 38 degrees. I would age the meat less if it is boned, I would say around 10 to 12 days depending on the size of the cuts. Smaller cuts require less time before freezing. One I have the cuts made I then vacuum seal and freeze. I will not discourage any person from using a processor, BUT most wont age your animal unless you ask them to hang it before it is butchered.

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Most people who do not eat javelina because they taste bad, have never tried javelina. They just listen to what other people tell them. We the Sheeple!

or maybe they tried 1 that wasn't cared for very well.......... B)

 

James

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That's what I did on my pack trip for pigs this year! 30 min after he was dead he was boned out . It was cool the day I killed and the meat was cool to the touch as I was bagging it. Never gutted it just hung it skinned it de-boned it done! Did it to save on weight to walk the five nasty miles back to the truck but no matter where I kill one from now on, if sunlight permits, I will do this every time. Easy peezy. Gotta bring that foot out but nothing else unedible.

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Great advise on javelina care. Best ways I've had javelina is made into birria or chorizo (homemade).

share your chorizo recipe if you don't mind. Mine sucks!

X2!!!

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Chorizo I have used white & red rice wine & red raspberry vinegars and been pleased with the results. Nakano Seasoned Rice Wine Original is what I use most.

 

1 1/2 lbs pork butt - I usually make 6 to 8 lb batches and use either 2/3 game 1/3 fatty pork butt, lately it's been 50/50 just to get a little more sausage

1/2 lb pork fat - I skip and make up with meat

1 bunch (4 to 6 oz) fresh cilantro, chopped, about 1 cup – I have used dried also, 1 to 2 tblspoons per 2 lbs, depends on how much you like it

1 fresh serrano or jalapeno or other hot pepper, seeded and finely chopped – I use 2 per 2 lbs seeded and deviened, finely diced

1/4 cup red wine vinegar - I have used red wine, rice wine & red raspberry vinegars, each adds it’s own distinctive flavor.

1 tblspn New Mexico or other dried chile powder

1 tblspn sweet Hungarian paprika

2 tspns kosher salt

1 1/2 tspn whole cumin seeds

1 tspn ground cumin

1/2 tspn coarsely ground black pepper

1/2 tspn ground cayenne pepper

1/4 tspn ground coriander

 

I like to add 1 tblspoon each of minced garlic and minced onion per 4 lbs, nice thing about making your own is you can customize it to your taste

 

grind meat/fat together with small plate, mix in spices/water and knead together, if you grind again to get a good mix of the spices use the big plate, sometimes the peppers won't go through the plate, just clean them out of the neck and hand mix them in. Cook small patty and decide if needs anything. If you want to add more bite leave the seeds in the peppers.

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Chorizo I have used white & red rice wine & red raspberry vinegars and been pleased with the results. Nakano Seasoned Rice Wine Original is what I use most.

 

1 1/2 lbs pork butt - I usually make 6 to 8 lb batches and use either 2/3 game 1/3 fatty pork butt, lately it's been 50/50 just to get a little more sausage

1/2 lb pork fat - I skip and make up with meat

1 bunch (4 to 6 oz) fresh cilantro, chopped, about 1 cup – I have used dried also, 1 to 2 tblspoons per 2 lbs, depends on how much you like it

1 fresh serrano or jalapeno or other hot pepper, seeded and finely chopped – I use 2 per 2 lbs seeded and deviened, finely diced

1/4 cup red wine vinegar - I have used red wine, rice wine & red raspberry vinegars, each adds it’s own distinctive flavor.

1 tblspn New Mexico or other dried chile powder

1 tblspn sweet Hungarian paprika

2 tspns kosher salt

1 1/2 tspn whole cumin seeds

1 tspn ground cumin

1/2 tspn coarsely ground black pepper

1/2 tspn ground cayenne pepper

1/4 tspn ground coriander

 

I like to add 1 tblspoon each of minced garlic and minced onion per 4 lbs, nice thing about making your own is you can customize it to your taste

 

grind meat/fat together with small plate, mix in spices/water and knead together, if you grind again to get a good mix of the spices use the big plate, sometimes the peppers won't go through the plate, just clean them out of the neck and hand mix them in. Cook small patty and decide if needs anything. If you want to add more bite leave the seeds in the peppers.

 

 

Thanks Slim: always a classic.

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